Doctoral Students

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John BaileyThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Office: Davison Hall, 020

John's primary interests include gender, sexuality, culture, and technology studies. In the past, he has studied how young men construct masculinity in online communities, and how gendered identities facilitate symbolic violence in digital space. He completed his B.A. in English and Sociology at the University of Connecticut, and his M.A. in Sociology at the University of Michigan.

Brittany Battle

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Office: Davison Hall, 015

Brittany is an ASA Minority Fellowship Program award recipient for 2017-2018. She received a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology (Law & Society concentration), Black American Studies, and Women's Studies from University of Delaware in 2008, a Master's degree in African American Studies from Temple University in 2012, and a Master's degree in Sociology from Rutgers University – New Brunswick in 2015. Her research interests include poverty and deservingness; criminal and family courts; and the construction and collateral consequences of social policies, specifically welfare and child support. Her MA thesis, War Widows and Welfare Queens: The Semiotics of Deservingness in the American Welfare System, used a sociology of perception framework to examine the cognitive underpinnings of distinctions between the “deserving” and “undeserving poor” and creates a conceptual model to understand “deservingness” along continuums of morality and eligibility for benefits (forthcoming, Oxford Handbook of Cognitive Sociology). Her dissertation, Deadbeat Dads, Single Moms, and Broken Homes?: A Sociocultural Analysis of the Child Support System, examines the U.S. child support system through observations of family court proceedings and in-depth interviews with individuals involved in the system. The project explores areas such as the use of shaming and stigma, the conceptualization of parenthood and family, and the criminal and financial consequences of involvement with the system. In addition, she is the Director of the Sociology Department's Multi-Generational Mentoring (MGM) Program which provides support and resources for undergraduate students interested in attending graduate school.

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Office: Davison Hall, 108

Armani Beck has earned a B.A. in Psychology and a Certificate in Sexuality and Gender Studies from The Pennsylvania State University, University Park (2014). She has also earned a M.Ed. in Human Sexuality from Widener University (2016). She is interested broadly in the intersectionality of race, gender, and sexuality. Armani's primary focus has been on sexual and gender diversity, with a specific focus on how non-binary and transgender-identified individuals navigate privilege and systems of oppression. Armani is extremely passionate about educating scholars at the undergraduate level, specifically in courses related to gender and sexuality.

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Office: Davison Hall, 041

Crystal received her B.S. in Journalism from the University of Colorado-Boulder. Her research focuses on how mixed-race people are shaping race relations in the United States by exploring multiracial attitudes towards racial inequalities as well as multiracial identity formation, maintenance and negotiation. In her dissertation, “The Ethnically Ambiguous Generation,” she is investigating processes of racialized meaning construction from the production to the consumption of mixed-race people in advertising, by explicitly studying how multiracial persons are conceived by advertisers, how racial/ethnic diversity/ambiguity are incorporated into TV commercials and online images/video, and how these racial messages are interpreted by consumers.    


Laura Callejas
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Office: Davison Hall, 043

Laura received her B.A (Sociology and Women and Gender Studies) and her M.A. in the Sociology department at Rutgers University-New Brunswick.  For her Master's thesis she examined where racial/ethnic minority students  go for college-entrance information and how that information impacts their chances of applying to college. As a research assistant she has done work examining the racial/ethnic and gender composition of student fans at college football games as well as providing statistical assistance on a project looking at gender and racial /ethnic inequality in faculty promotion and pay at Rutgers University. Most recently she is working on a project using network data to examine the relationship between conflict and social status mobility in middle schools. Laura is also interested in the relationship between bullying behaviors in youth and animal abuse. 

 

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Lisa's primary areas of interest include culture, cognition and identity, and she is particularly fascinated with the process of identity construction and maintenance. Through in-depth, semi-structured interviews with individuals associated with diverse identities, Lisa's dissertation explores how "doing identity" operates as a generic, social process. Lisa received her BA in Sociology from Loyola University (Maryland) and her MA in Sociology from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.

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Bridging sociology, psychology, and molecular biology, Andrea Catone’s research illuminates how the effects of trauma get transmitted within families. Her dissertation examines the extent to which parenting practices, ranging from neglect to over-attachment, trigger epigenetic changes in genes that regulate offspring’s mental health. She aims to identify and target factors that would alleviate the consequences of trauma, child abuse, and neglect. Andrea is the recipient of an AAUW American Dissertation Fellowship for the 2016-17 award year.

Andrea’s areas of interest include social movement networks, data science, cognition and culture, social genomics and epigenetics, neuroscience, ethnography, and narrative analysis. Andrea’s experience and training make her equally adept at analyzing micro-interaction and big data with the ability to switch between scopes with agility.  In addition to her dissertation, Andrea recently researched the role of the future in memory, the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, social movement network dynamics, and intergenerational transmission of trauma. She was also a Graduate Associate with the Center for European Studies at Rutgers University. Andrea previously studied philosophy at Rutgers University, where she received her BA, as well as at Humboldt Universität Berlin during her Fulbright Fellowship year. Andrea is the co-founder of Action Together New Jersey and Action Together Network.

 

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Office: Davison Hall, 106

Kayla received her B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania, where she majored in Political Science, Philosophy and Economics. Since graduating, she has been the Director of Student Programs for the World Affairs Council of Philadelphia, and recently served as the Alumni Relations Coordinator at the University of Pennsylvania. Kayla is interested in inequality in education and higher education environments with a particular focus on short- and long-term consequences for personal, social, and educational outcomes.  She looks forward to conducting research on the psychosocial experiences of minority students in higher education, with a comparative focus across cultural contexts.

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Office: Davison Hall, 019

My interests are globalization and political economy, sociology of expertise and science, technology studies. More specifically, my research focuses on the interactions between international, regional and "national" organizations struggling and negotiating to frame intellectual property after the emergence of the World Trade Organization, 1995 in Turkey. I received my BA in Philosophy (highest) and Political Science (high honor) from Bogazici University , Istanbul. I have an MA degree in Human Rights (distinction for the thesis) at University College London, awarded by Jean Monnet Scholarship Agency. I am currently a graduate fellow of a project "Networks of Exchange: Mobilities of Knowledge in a Globalized World" at the Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis.

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Office: Davison Hall, 019  

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Office: Davison Hall, 012

Hello! I'm a sociologist trying to understand geopolitics in the Trans-Pacific region from queer, feminist, and decolonial perspectives. My questions gravitate towards the issues of the Korean division and unification, Korean diaspora, Japanese and U.S. imperialisms, and community solidarity. For instance, is it possible to achieve unification without reinforcing patriarchal Korean nationalism? What does Korean unification mean to diasporic Koreans and queer/trans Koreans? How do Korean community organizers cultivate solidarity across oceans and borders? I use ethnographic methods to explore the experiences of Koreans in the diaspora, especially women, queers, and trans folks who are engaged in community organizing. In addition to research, I also really enjoy teaching sociology, from introductory courses to research methods and theory. In the classroom, I focus on challenging, inspiring, and empowering my students by asking them critical questions rather than spoon-feeding answers. I am committed to fostering my students' intellectual, professional, political, and spiritual growth through collaborative learning. I believe that relevant education that activates the community leaders in ourselves is what this world needs for the 21st century. As a servant of public higher education, I strive to offer world-class quality education that heals our society, one student at a time. 

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Office: Davison Hall, 133

Maria I. Espinoza research interests include the privatization of health, as well as the media and community response to epidemics and environmental risk, environmental racism, and biopolitics. Prior to pursuing a graduate degree, Maria worked in the social sector as a venture coordinator for ASHOKA in the Andean Region, seeking and obtaining financial support for social entrepreneurs. Later, she worked in Peru as a consultant, conducting social and environmental impact assessment studies. Maria earned her B.A. from the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru, and her M.A. in Sociology from Syracuse University. She is currently a graduate fellow at the Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis, participating in the 2015-2016 project “Ethical Subjects: Moralities, Laws, and Histories.”

 

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Office: Davison Hall, 017

Idit Fast is interested in education policy and educational inequality. Her work focuses on understanding processes of policy implementation and on studying policy consequences in everyday life. She received her BA in Sociology and Philosophy and MA in Sociology from Tel Aviv University in Israel. Her MA thesis, recently published in Sociology of Education, examined the historical process by which school violence came to dominate education policy in Israel. Currently, she is conducting a study looking into how the availability of charter schools in a school district shapes the length of students' trip to school. In addition, she is participating in a research project examining inequalities in people's travel patterns in the United States using smartphone application technology to detect respondents' movement and perceptions of their environment in real time. She is also collaborating in a study on the implementation of anti-bullying policies in middles schools in New Jersey.

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Office: Davison Hall, 140

Ben received a BA in Anthropology and an MA in Education from the University of Michigan. He also has an MA in Humanities and Social Thought from New York University. Ben is the co-founder and advisory board member of the human rights video advocacy organization, Organization for Visual Progression (visualprogression.org). He is interested in human rights advocacy, globalization, development, post-colonial theory, gender, race/ethnicity, and visual media.   

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Office: Davison Hall, 105-1

Lydia received her BA from Alfred University in May 2017, graduating summa cum laude with an individually structured major titled “Social Justice and Popular Media.” Her undergraduate senior thesis examined factors causing emotional abuse recognition ability, specifically focusing on romanticization of intimate partner violence in fictional media, and received a Sigma Xi Outstanding Undergraduate Research Award. She plans to continue research in the interactions between people and fictional media, with a concentration on the representation of intimate partnerships.

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Office: Davison Hall, 046

Christine Galotti received her B.A. in Sociology, Women and Gender Studies, and Literature from the City University of New York at Hunter College. Her research interests include environmental sociology, sociology of the body, culture, and identity. She is currently developing such projects as the sociological objectification of human and non-human bodies, as well as notions of 'correcting' body parts according to cultural norms. Christine is also analyzing Back-To-The-Land movements of the past century, with a particular focus on recent attempts to live sustainable lifestyles and what that engenders within multicultural spaces.

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Office: Davison Hall, 012

Alexandra (Lexi) Gervis is broadly interested in economic and cultural sociology; specifically, she explores questions around income and wealth inequality, race and inequality, social mobility, and how organizations (particularly, philanthropic ones) play a role in the reproduction of inequality. Her MA thesis explored the relationship between social class, social distance, and allocating decisions when donating, both in terms of magnitude (how much a family gives) and type (the kinds of organizations they select). She holds a BA from Emory University, and she is currently a Rutgers Presidential Fellow.

Adrian Good

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Office: Davison Hall, 013

Adrian Good is interested in culture and cognition, health, alcohol use, accidents, and the life course effects of traumatic events. He received his BA in Management and Society from UNC-Chapel Hill in 2005, and completed an MA in Sociology at UNC-Greensboro in 2013. His MA thesis examines the ways male college students describe their relationship with alcohol as a cultural object. He is also interested in how people make sense of traumatic events, building bridges between former and present selves.

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Office: Davison Hall, 009

Dustin received his B.A in Sociology from Temple University in 2013. His research interests include the labor movement, political-economy, social class and economic inequality. Particularly he is interested in researching the working lives of recent college graduates and how their economic prospects have changed in relation to the shift toward neoliberalism and the fallout from the great recession. Dustin has previously worked in the labor movement as an organizer and mobilizer. 

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Office: Davison Hall, 012

Tsai-Yen is interested in gender, education, food and science and technology studies. She has studied how an engineering laboratory became masculinized. She is currently working on a study of high school curriculum tracking decisions in Taiwan. Tsai-Yen received her bachelor's degree in Sociology from National Taiwan University and her M.A. in Sociology at National Tsing Hua University.

Hayes, Endia Louise This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Office: Davison Hall, 105-2

Standing by the words of Toni Morrison to “familiarize the strange and mystify the familiar,” Endia seeks to honor these words through her scholarship. Endia graduated from Spelman College with a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology and Anthropology in May 2017. Her undergraduate thesis and final Mellon May Undergraduate Fellowship project studied the case of Jaelyn Young, the only Black woman arrested in an attempt to travel to Iraq and Syria to join ISIL. Endia used Young as the focal point of an analysis of media and news accounts to offer nuance to the evolving role of women as informal leaders of the group as well as Young’s experience as a criminalized subject under law. Her work earned her departmental honors as well as prize for Outstanding Thesis. Endia hopes to continue studying social movements and its intersections with religion, the political, gender/sexuality, and, possibly even, race.

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Office: Davison Hall, 016

Brooklynn Hitchens received her B.A. from the University of Delaware in Black American Studies and English and completed her M.A. in Sociology at Rutgers University. Her research investigates how low-income Black women navigate crime and violence in urban spaces, specifically through the lens of race, class, and gender inequalities. Her mixed method dissertation uses street participatory action research (PAR) methods to explore how structural violence—or socio-systemic violence that is embedded in structures and institutions—influences the development of street identities in low-income Black women and girls. Her work has been featured in Sociological Forum, Race & Justice, Feminist Criminology, and the Journal of Black Psychology.

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Office: Davison Hall, 044

Jorie works in the areas of mental health and illness, embodiment, biology, disability, social support, and emotion within dyadic and network contexts. Her projects include the development and testing of a biopsychosocial model of postpartum depression, a qualitative investigation of how laypeople think about and respond to sadness in their social partners, and a study of how brain-injured subjects account for emotional disturbance in relation to the damaged brain. Central to all these projects is the matter of how cultural and social-network factors influence the ways we perceive, explain, and address our own and others' suffering. Jorie also serves as Editor for the journal RJS: The Rutgers Journal of Sociology. She is presently an NSF Graduate Research Fellow, and she holds a BA in anthropology from the University of Chicago.

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Office: Davison Hall, 011

Ashley received her B.A in Sociology from the City University of New York at City College. Her research interests include examining the intersections of race, gender, institutions, and public policy impeding opportunities for people of color. In the past Ashley worked as a project associate at The Center for Social Inclusion, a racial equity and policy strategy organization. Her past research includes examining racial disparities in beast feeding, Black and Latino activism, and Obama Fatherhood policies.

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Office: Davison Hall,  139

Hwa-Yen's research interests include social psychology, narrative, cognition and the senses, trauma, health and illness, and violence. He has studied Taiwanese folk healers' narratological management of the contradiction between a closed and an open vision of the future. Currently, through reading illness narratives published in the U.S., Hwa-Yen is examining how "positive" changes in temporal and spatial experience in the midst of life crises are mediated by certain generic narrative strategies. Hwa-Yen holds a bachelor's degree in finance and an M.A. in sociology, both from National Taiwan University. In his free time, Hwa-Yen enjoys napping, daydreaming, and the art of air guitar.   

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Office: Davison Hall, 017

My research interests stand in the crossroads of culture and cognition. I am fascinated with cultural knowledge and classification. The inquiry of social conceptualization and categorization embedded and performed in everyday practice, leads me to engagement with innovative phenomenological and visual methodologies. In my Master Thesis (Hebrew University of Jerusalem) I studied the spatial perceptions of Jerusalemites and Qudsis – local Israelis and Palestinians. Through the analysis mental mapping and sketch-mapping, Jerusalem and Al-Quds were interpreted from bottom-up perspective on borders, patterns, categorizations, experiences and identities.  

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Office: Davison Hall, 012

Ying-Chao Kao is an activist scholar whose research focuses on sexuality and gender, intersectionality, inequality and culture. In addition to generating sociological knowledge, he participates in the social movements of the Taiwanese American community and in sexual rights activism in East Asia. Kao received his Master's degree in sociology from National Taiwan University, R.O.C. (Taiwan). His master’s thesis uses historical and ethnographic approaches to delineate how the Taiwanese conscription system constructs hegemonic masculinity and ensuing resistance in young soldiers’ daily life. As a mixed-method and bilingual researcher, Kao currently is working on two projects: Taiwanese BDSM subculture based on life histories and archival data; religious factors influencing attitudes toward homosexuality in international survey databases. His work has been published in ASA journal ContextsGender Equity Education Quarterly (in Chinese), in the edited book So I Do My Fieldwork: Personal Journeys of a Quaternary Practice (in Chinese), and in the newspaper Taipei Times.

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Office: Davison Hall, 140

Amanda Kaplan is generally interested in the sociology of ideas—hegemonic social orders, grammars of thinking, and their social and material implications—and is committed to a study and praxis of love, listening, and radical pedagogy/ intellectual exchange broadly defined. These interests and commitments inform Amanda’s everyday life, activism, teaching practice, and research, which currently concerns (re)presentations of female genitalia, cosmologies and cosmetics, colonialism, whiteness, and the trope of discovering. Amanda holds an MA in Sociology (Rutgers), an MA in Humanities and Social Thought (NYU), a BA in Sociology and Mathematics (Vassar), and a graduate certificate in Women and Gender Studies (Rutgers). If seemingly preoccupied, Amanda is most likely dreaming of transdisciplinary education, new narratives, cheese, or really big dogs.

kelly kato

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Office: Davison Hall, 133

Kelly is interested in topics of medical sociology, health disparities, psychiatric disorders among racial/ethnic minorities and implications of public health policies. She received a B.A. in Psychology from Middle Tennessee State University, and worked as a research assistant at Vanderbilt University. Her current research explores the association between the acculturation process experienced by immigrants, and objective and subjective mental health among Hispanics and Asians.

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Ofice: Davison Hall, 011

Brandon received his B.A in Sociology from the University of Iowa. His research interests include gender, race, medical sociology, science & technology studies, and social theory. His dissertation explores the expansion of the testosterone industry and how cultural assumptions about race and gender are imbued into research on testosterone-based pharmaceuticals. Brandon also collaborates with two research groups: In the first, Brandon works with Dr. Kristen Springer (Rutgers) and Dr. Mary Himmelstein (UConn) using sociological theory and social neuroscience to study masculinity and health processes. In the second, Brandon collaborates with Dr. Rebecca Jordan-Young (Barnard), Dr. Katrina Karkazis (Stanford), and Liz Carlin (CUNY) investigating how testosterone is conceptualized in discordant ways across scientific fields.

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Office: Davison Hall, 019

Elizabeth received her B.A. in Sociology Honors and minored in Women's and Gender Studies from the University of Texas at Austin in 2016. Her honor's thesis "To Transform Lives for the Benefit of Society: Racism, Diversity Theater, and the University of Texas" has largely informed her current research interests in diversity, race and racism, performance, institutional theory, language, and symbolism. In her graduate study she hopes to continue to explore issues of diversity in higher education.   

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Office: Davison Hall, 014

Mario Mercado-Diaz is interested in comparing the ways in which Caribbean diaspora members map diverse urban spaces throughout their migratory movements, and how they establish and maintain networks of affection across borders. He received his BA in Hispanic Studies from the Universidad de Puerto Rico, Río Piedras in 2012 and completed his masters degree in Latin American Studies at the University of Texas-Austin in 2015. For his masters thesis "Distances and Proximities: Havana and San Juan from the Point of View of Literature and Oral Histories", he conducted a comparative ethnographic and literary research on how residents of San Juan, Puerto Rico and Havana, Cuba describe and use urban space, and how this affects their notions of citizenship and belonging (see http://lavigia.wix.com/elmuelle). He has also published journalistic articles in various online magazines, both in English and in Spanish.

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Office: Davison Hall, 046

Lauren is interested in the structural and psychosocial determinants of health, social stratification, and the spatial contexts of health disparities. Her Master’s work explores various pathways which link socioeconomic status to outcomes in sleep quality.  Lauren received a BA from Fairfield University in 2010.   

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Office: Davison Hall, 139  

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Office: Davison Hall, 138

Alex graduated with a BA in sociology from the University of New Hampshire in 2014. His general research interests include sociology of culture, identity, social interaction, and criminology. Of particular interest is how those elements and more apply to contemporary mediated culture and the history of mediated culture.

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Office: Davison Hall, 013

Steph Peña-Alves received her B.A. in Psychology from the City University of New York at Hunter College. Her research interests include culture, cognition, emotions, identity, language, and symbolism. In past projects, she has written about the culture of modern psychiatry and diagnosis of mental illness as a cultural rite of passage. Steph's current work revolves around spatial metaphors and the symbolic dimensions of material objects.   

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Office: Davison Hall, 110

Jason holds a B.A. in Government and an M.S. in Library and Information Science from Long Island University. His research interests are in criminology, with an emphasis on victimization, and in health.

He is currently working on three research projects. The first concerns the relationship between violent crime and the interpersonal difficulties of adolescent victims with members of their social networks. The second considers how the deployment of self-protective behaviors by victims of criminal violence influences levels of post-incident emotional distress. The last is an investigation of the social determinants of preventive health behavior among sexual minority men.

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Office: Davison Hall, 105-5

Allegra received her B.A. from Swarthmore College in 2014, where she majored in History and Political Science. Following graduation, she worked as the senior center coordinator for the Center on Children and Families at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC. Allegra is interested in racial disparities in the criminal justice system, more specifically on the impacts of incarceration for those "doing time on the outside." Her work will focus on the social capital of the female partners of those who are incarcerated as well as the psychological impact on and educational outcomes for their children.

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Office: Davison Hall, 044

Jessica is interested in cultural sociology with a particular focus on the social construction of artists and art institutions.  She received her BA in Sociology from Haverford College.  In the past Jess has conducted research on the various roles of mental illness in art therapy and the Outsider Art movement, examining how art therapists contend with Outsider Art’s conflicting presentation of mentally ill artists and maintain their professional legitimacy. 

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Office: Davison Hall, 015

Teja’s research interests include health, aging and the life course, family, and quantitative methods. Her dissertation, titled Three Essays on the Caregiving Experience: Informal Caregivers’ Perception of Burden and Benefits, the Importance of Coping Resources, and How Caregiver Experience Matters for Care Recipients, examines caregivers’ experiences of caregiving to US older adults. Her published work investigates the role of driving status and transportation assistance for older adults’ social participation (Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological and Social Sciences) and the importance of children’s school meal program participation for household adults’ food security (The Intersection of Food and Public Health: Examining Current Challenges and Solutions in Policy and Politics). Proficient in Stata, R, and Mplus, she is passionate about statistical computing and looking for answers to sociological questions using quantitative data.

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Office: Davison Hall, 016 

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Office: Davison Hall, 015

Alicia's dissertation research uses a mixed-methods approach to explore how peer interpersonal aggression varies between and within schools. She designed and piloted an original survey called the School Climate Understanding and Building Aspirations (SCUBA) Survey, which includes new measures for studying generalized forms of peer aggression. Alicia uses data from this survey, along with ethnographic observations and interviews in high schools that vary in socioeconomic makeup and neighborhood setting, to 1) explore the nature, extent, locations (covert or overt) and targets of youth interpersonal aggression; and 2) to understand how variation in exposure to victimization is shaped by community factors, organizational qualities such as school culture, as well as by variation across classroom environments within the school. Prior to beginning her doctoral work, Alicia worked as a classroom teacher in disadvantaged communities in New York City and New Jersey. These experiences inform her research interests related to inequalities in educational experiences influence student outcomes. Her previous work explores how gentrification shapes the ways in which youth experience spaces within their communities. Alicia completed the Pre-Doctoral Leadership Development Institute at Rutgers University and currently works with the School Climate Transformation Project through the Center for Applied Psychology, which supports New Jersey schools in using data to drive the school climate improvement process.

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Office: Davison Hall, 138 

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Eiko's research interests include culture and cognition, sociology of the body, history of medicine, science and technology and gender. Her dissertation examines the competing conceptualizations of the begining of life in the late Tokugawa period in Japan (the mid-eighteenth to the late nineteenth century). She analyzes the ways in which different stakeholders, such as moral entrepreneurs, government officials and ordinary people, participated in construcing the category of the human personhood. Drawing on historical materials including anti-abortion and infanticide pamphlets, legal records, and obstetrical text books, her study sheds light on the contested moral status of the fetus and infant. Eiko received her BA in anthropology and MA in sociology from the University of Hawai`i at Manoa. She previously studied civil society, social movements and feminism.

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Office: Davison Hall, 020

Jomaira Salas Pujols is a third-year Ph.D. student in the Department of Sociology at Rutgers University whose research focuses on higher education, race, and the academic achievement of girls of color. She studies various forms of resistance to structural racism on college campuses by analyzing campus protests and the everyday academic strategies of Black and Latina students. Jomaira uses mixed-methods and participatory action research to develop new epistemologies of underrepresented communities. In the Spring of 2017, she became a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program Fellow. 

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Office: Davison Hall, 136

I study the cultural ideas and assumptions that get infused in medicine. My projects fall primarily in the fields of health, gender, reproduction, embodiment, science and technology studies, and environment. My current research, which is funded by the Society of Family Planning, looks at “pregnancy planning” as a contemporary medical and social phenomenon and I examine the dominant ideas about gender, race, and class embedded within it. I have published articles in Social Science & MedicineJournal of Health and Social Behavior, and Sociological Forum. I received my B.A. in Political Science from Kenyon College in 2010. 

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Office: Davison Hall, 110

Andrew’s research examines the normative order of science communication, with an emphasis on environmental hazards. Along with Lee Clarke and Harvey Molotch, he conducted in-depth interviews with Louisiana scientists to assess how Hurricane Katrina affected the ways they communicate risk. He has also analyzed how science organizations responded to the manslaughter case against scientists and engineers who told the citizens of L’Aquila, Italy that there was “no danger” a few days before an earthquake struck the city, killing 309 people. The two cases reveal that some scientists face moral dilemmas in communicating risk, characterized by a responsibility to help people, coupled with the impression that communicating with the public may be academically or politically inappropriate. In his free time, Andrew enjoys reading, making music, exercising, and spending time with his wife and son. He is currently working at a software company in New Brunswick.

 

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Office: Davison Hall, 136

Hannah received her B.A. from New York University's Gallatin School of Individualized Study in 2013, where she studied social change, oppression, performance, and German. She is interested in gender and sexuality, urban-rural divides, and the social construction of the "obesity epidemic" - particularly issues of medical authority, social control, and discrimination. Her previous research includes work on weight loss campaigns, post-WWII German memory and identity, and inequities in education.

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Office: Davison Hall, 049

Nil Uzun is interested in global sociology, social movements, sociology of knowledge and sociology of science. She holds a B.A. in economics from Bogazici University (Istanbul), an MA in cultural studies from Sabanci University (Istanbul), and an MA in social anthropology from Central European University (Budapest). Nil has been working on multiple different topics, including transnational networks of human rights organizations in Argentina and Turkey, and the representations of ‘Middle East women’ in Western contemporary art. Her recent work focuses on the geopolitics of academic knowledge production in social sciences on ‘the Middle East’, particularly in area studies journals and South to South critical academic networks.   

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Office: Davison Hall, 014

Niina Vuolajärvi's (MSSc, MA) primary research interests include gender, sexuality, migration, prostitution and immigration policies, and ethnographic methods. In her ethnographic PhD research "Precarious Intimacies - Commercial Sex and Migration in the Nordic Region", she combines migration and precarization research perspectives to the inquiries of intimacies. For the study she conducts fieldwork in Finland, Sweden, and Norway.

Niina is a Fulbright scholar and part of the management and steering committee of a EU-funded research network 'ProsPol: Comparing European Prostitution Policies: Understanding Scales and Cultures of Governance.'

Lior Photo

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Office: Davison Hall, 009

Lior is broadly interested in race and ethnicity, immigration, identities, and power. He received his B.A in Sociology and in Middle Eastern Studies, and M.A in Sociology from Tel Aviv University in Israel. In his M.A thesis, he studied the relationship between Zionist Jews and British Officers who served in the Palestine Police Force during the British Mandate of Palestine (1918-1948).

Contact Us

Department of Sociology
Davison Hall
26 Nichol Avenue,
New Brunswick, NJ 08901


P  848-932-4029
F  732-932-6067