Culture and Cognition

Culture and Cognition

  • Jozsef photo Professor
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    Office: Davison Hall, 132A

    Professor of Sociology, teaches courses in classical sociological theory, global structures and change, historical sociology, and historical-comparative methods. His interests include narrative and visual sociologies of historical experiences, politics and performing arts, knowledge and otherness, large-scale (indeed global) transformations, and intersections of political economy, geopolitics, coloniality, ethics, aesthetics and power.

  • brooks thumbAssociate Professor
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    Office: 132 George Street
    Office Phone: 732-445-7395

    Associate Professor in Women’s and Gender Studies and Sociology, teaches courses in comparative and historical sociology, globalization and postcolonial social formations.  Her research interests include the sociology of gender and labor, critical political economy, globalization, social movements, feminist theory, gender and development, consumption, comparative sociology, Central American studies, South Asian studies, nationalism, post-coloniality and critical race theory.  She is currently finishing a book on transnational organizing in the garment industry with a focus on Dhaka , San Salvador and New York City.

  • CeruloProfessor
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    Office: Davison Hall, 130

    Professor of Sociology, teaches courses in culture, media, social interaction, social deviance, and statistics.  She has authored several books and articles in the areas of culture and cognition, symbol systems and meaning, media and technology, social change, decision making, identity construction, and measurement techniques.  Cerulo just completed a study on olfactory meaning and she is currently in the field on a book length project entitled Dreams of a Lifetime: Society, Culture and Our Wishful Imaginings

  • clarke5Professor
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    Office: Davison Hall, 113

    Professor of Sociology, writes about organizations, failure, disaster, risk communication, and the boundaries between politics and science. His last work, Worst Cases: Terror and Catastrophe in the Popular Imagination was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2006. Clarke is currently writing a book about how science and politics meet, and don’t meet, regarding the loss of America’s wetlands and the idea of “coastal restoration.”  

    http://leeclarke.com/clarkebio.html

  • cohenAssociate Professor
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    Office: Hill Hall, 621, Newark
    Office Phone: 732-445-4047 & 732-122-5422

    Associate Professor of Sociology, teaches Sociology in the Graduate Program and teaches his undergraduate courses on the faculty in Sociology at Rutgers in Newark. His Graduate Program courses include classical and contemporary social theory. His research interests include the sociology of everyday life, contemporary and classical social theory, the sociology of modernity, and the history of social thought. His new book Solitary Action is forthcoming from Oxford University Press.

  • HorwitzsmallProfessor
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    Office: Health Institute

    Board of Governors and Distinguished Professor of Sociology, teaches courses in mental health and illness and the sociology of normality and abnormality. His research interests are in the areas of social definitions of mental illness, medicalization, and the impact of social roles on mental health. He is currently working on a book that examines the interplay of cultural and biological factors on conceptions of normality and abnormality.    

  • kempner 2018Associate Professor
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    Office: Davison Hall, 134

    Joanna Kempner, associate professor of sociology, works at the intersection of medicine, science, gender, and the body. Kempner investigates the production of knowledge and ignorance as cultural work, inscribed with and shaped by tacit assumptions about social relations across gender, race, and class. Her award-winning book, Not Tonight: Migraine and the Politics of Gender and Health (Chicago 2014), examines the social values embedded in the way we talk about, understand, and make policies for people in pain. She is currently writing a book about citizen scientists who use psychedelic medicine to treat pain. She teaches courses on social problems, health and illness, and the sociology of the body.

  • lee smallAssociate Professor
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    Office: Davison Hall, 141
    Office Phone: 848-932-7807

    Associate Professor of Sociology. Her research and teaching areas include race and ethnicity, gender, politics, immigration, law and society, and science and medicine. She is the author of Fictive Kinship: Family Reunification and the Meaning of Race and Nation in American Immigration and co-editor of Genetics and the Unsettled Past: The Collision of DNA, Race, and History.

  • FAC McLean PaulProfessor
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    Office: Davison Hall, 126

    Professor of Sociology, teaches courses on sociological theory, network analysis, political and economic sociology, and the sociology of culture. One main line of research explores the relationship between social network structure and cultural practices and schemata. The Art of the Network(Duke UP, 2007) treated this relationship by examining political patronage networks and letter-writing in Renaissance Florence. His second book, Culture in Networks (Polity, 2017), explores various ways in which culture and networks intersect across sundry aspects of social life. Other interests include politics in early modern states, the network organization of the Renaissance economy, Adam Smith's social theory, and the culture of videogaming. 

       

  • Fac Shepherd HanaAssistant Professor
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    Office: Davison Hall, 037

    Assistant Professor of Sociology. Shepherd teaches classes in interventions and social change, organizations, and culture. She studies how social networks, social norms and group processes, culture, and organizations facilitate or impede social change. She is currently working on a series of projects on the enforcement of local labor law, and on social networks and low-wage work.

  • Fac Stein ArleneProfessor
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    Office: Davison Hall, 045

    Professor of sociology, specializing in the intersection of gender, sexuality, culture, and politics, and director of the Institute for Research on Women at Rutgers. The author or editor of nine books, she teaches courses on the sociology of gender and sexuality, culture, self and society, and trauma/memory, among other subjects. She serves on the graduate faculty of the Department of Women's and Gender Studies.

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    eviatarProfessor    
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    Office: Davison Hall, 131

    Professor Zerubavel is Board of Governors and Distinguished Professor of Sociology. He teaches courses in cognitive sociology, sociology of time, social memory, and sociological theory. His latest five books explored the sociomental shape of the past, the social organization of silence and denial, the social construction of genealogical relatedness, the sociology of inattention, and the phenomenology and semiotics of taken-for-grantedness. He is currently writing a book on formal-sociological theorizing.