Culture and Cognition

Culture and Cognition

  • Brooks, Ethel

    • Portrait
    • Ethel Brooks
    • Associate Professor
    • Ph.D. New York University, 2000
    • Email: ethel.brooks@rutgers.edu
    • Office: 132 George Street
    • Phone: 732-445-7395
    • Dr. Brooks is an Associate Professor in Women’s and Gender Studies and Sociology, teaches courses in comparative and historical sociology, globalization and postcolonial social formations. She is currently finishing a book on transnational organizing in the garment industry with a focus on Dhaka , San Salvador and New York City.

      Dr. Brooks is interested in relations of gender, race, class, labor practices and nation-state formations, with a focus on South Asia, Central America and the United States. Her research explores areas of critical political economy, globalization, social movements, feminist theory, comparative sociology, nationalism, urban geographies and post-colonialism, with close attention to epistemology. In her dissertation, she examined three transnationally-organized protest movements for workers' rights in the global garment industry: (1) against poor working conditions in export-processing zones in El Salvador; (2) against the use of child labor in the Bangladesh garment industry; and (3) against immigrant sweatshops in New York City. Her work focuses on the relationship between protest organizers and the mostly women workers they represent, as part of the everyday manifestations of globalized production practices. She is currently working on a book that looks at transnational labor organizing, women's work and relations of globalization and empire.

      Dr. Brooks's recent and forthcoming publications include "Transnational Protest, Production and Women's Labor: The politics of sweatshops and the global garment industry," forthcoming in The Journal of International Labor and Working Class History, 2001; "Bangladesh's Garment Industry, Child Labor and Urban Sustainability," forthcoming in Saskia Sassen, ed., The Encyclopedia of Urban Sustainability, (UNESCO: 2001); "Globalized Chinese Capital in Central America," with Amy Freedman, in Asian Pacific Perspectives, May 2001; "Campañas transnacionales de protesta y la nueva división internacional de trabajo: Cuestiones de género en el sector maquila," in Apuntes de Investigación, November 2000; and "After the Wars: Cross-Border Organizing in Central America" with Winifred Tate in NACLA: Report on the Americas, Special Issue on Labor, January/February 1999. Her future projects include an examination of consumption practices and discourses of empire, gender and agrobusiness in Central America and South Asia and a critical study of Romanies and discursive formations of "gypsiness." Professor Brooks has a joint appointment with the Department of Women's and Gender Studies.

  • Cerulo, Karen A.

    • Portrait
    • Karen A. Cerulo
    • Professor
    • Ph.D. Princeton, 1985
    • Email: cerulo@sociology.rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, 130
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Professor of Sociology, teaches courses in culture, media, social interaction, social deviance, and statistics.  She has authored several books and articles in the areas of culture and cognition, symbol systems and meaning, media and technology, social change, decision making, identity construction, and measurement techniques.  Cerulo just completed a study on olfactory meaning and both an article and book length project entitled Dreams of a Lifetime: How Culture Shapes Our Future Imaginings.

      Professor Cerulo's research addresses a variety of themes within the sociology of culture and cognition.

      Much of Professor Cerulo's works explore the social foundations of symbol systems -- music, scent, verbal scripts, and visual images. Her research examines the ways in which social actors use such symbols to construct personal identity, collective identity, and the identity of eras, events, and places. Her work also charts the ways in which social factors -- i.e. the nature of social ties, the stability of social environments, power structures, economic systems of exchange, and technological innovations – help to shape the content, form, meaning, and effectiveness of symbols. She has just completed an article length piece entitled “Scents and Sensibility: Olfaction, Sense-making and Meaning Attribution” (published in the American Sociological Review). Here, she uses focus group data to understand the role played by neural, physical, and sociocultural elements when we process the messages contained in commercial perfume scents.

      Professor Cerulo's writings are often noted for their contributions to the literature on measurement. She has developed a number of indicators designed to systematically capture verbal and non-verbal symbol structure. These measures render aural, olfactory, literary, and visual objects extremely accessible sources of social science data, amenable to all of the rigorous methods that are central to the social science tradition.

      In recent years, Professor Cerulo has turned her attentions to the social and cultural foundations of cognitive concepts and schema. Her work pays special attention to the links between cultural sociology and cognitive neuroscience. She edited and contributed both to a special issue on this topic published in the journal Poetics (2010) and a special section published in Sociological Forum (December 2014).

      One prominent theme in Professor Cerulo's work on conceptualization concerns new communication technologies. Specifically, she explores how emerging communication media can change the ways in which individuals perceive social actors and social groups, experience social connectedness, and define forums of social action.

      Some of Professor Cerulo's work explores the conceptualization of the best and worst of people, places, objects and events. Her book Never Saw It Coming builds on theories and ideas forwarded by both cultural and cognitive sociologists. Professor Cerulo argues that the inability to envision and specify the worst is a sociocultural phenomenon. Indeed, in a broad array of social situations, she discovers that conceptions of the worst represent a gap in many cultures' shared frames of reference. The worst is a "blind spot" created by a variety of normative and patterned sociocultural practices – practices that, despite any single individual's intentions, keep the worst veiled and difficult to define. In her work, Professor Cerulo itemizes and unpacks these practices. She explores as well the ways in which certain elements of social structure may encourage this biased perspective. Finally, she considers the social consequences and pitfalls that masking the worst can exact. In so doing, she questions whether a more symmetrical view of quality is an achievable ... or a desirable social goal.

      Spurred by some of the issues raised in Never Saw It Coming, Professor Cerulo has just completed work on a book entitled Dreams of a Lifetime: How Culture Shapes Our Future Imaginings (with Janet M. Ruane). The authors argue that dreams are thought to be matters of an individual's heart and mind. But in this book, the authors explore the sociocultural dimensions that organize and structure what Americans do (or do not) dream about, the ways in which they dream, variations in dreams according to one's social location, and when, if ever, people stop dreaming.

      Professor Cerulo's articles appear in a wide variety of journals including the American Sociological Review, Social Forces, Social Psychology Quarterly, Sociological Methods and Research, Sociological Forum, Sociological Inquiry, Sociological Focus, Communication Research, Contemporary Sociology, Poetics, Social Science Research, Law and Policy, Science As Culture, and annuals and collections such as the Annual Review of Sociology, the Encyclopedia of Nationalism, the International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences, the Handbook of Cultural Sociology, the Handbook of Social Theory, Research in Political Sociology, and the World Book Encyclopedia. She is the author of Never Saw It Coming: Cultural Challenges to Envisioning the Worst (University of Chicago Press, 2006), Deciphering Violence: The Cognitive Order of Right and Wrong (Routledge,1998), and Identity Designs: The Sights and Sounds of a Nation – winner of these Culture Section's "Best Book Award, 1996" (The Rose Book series of the ASA, Rutgers University Press,1995). She also co-authored Second Thoughts: Seeing Conventional Wisdom through the Sociological Eye (Sage, 2015), and edited a collection entitled Culture in Mind: Toward a Sociology of Culture and Cognition (Routledge, 2002).

      Professor Cerulo served as the Sociology Department Chair from July 2009 to August 2012. She has also served as the Chair of the ASA's Culture section (2009 through 2010), where she also functions as the section's network coordinator, and the director of the Culture and Cognition Network. She is a former Vice President of the Eastern Sociological Society and the current editor of Sociological Forum, the flagship journal of the Eastern Sociological Society. In 2013, she was named the Robin M. Williams Jr. Lecturer by the Eastern Sociological Society and she also won that organization's 2013 Merit Award. In 2012, she received the Rutgers University Scholar-Teacher Award, recognizing both her pedagogy and research in sociology. She was elected to the Sociological Research Association.

      Professor Cerulo’s work receives regular press attention. Several of her studies have been featured in The Chicago Sun Times, LeMonde, The New York Daily News, The New York Times, NJ.com, National Public Radio, The New Republic, Psychology Today, Scientific American, Slate Magazine, The Society Pages, The Times of India, and USA Today

       

  • Chaudhary, Ali R.

    • Portrait
    • Ali R. Chaudhary
    • Assistant Professor
    • Ph.D. University of California, Davis
    • Email: ali.chaudhary@rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, 132B
    • Website: https://www.sociologistmusician.com/
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • I am an Assistant Professor of Sociology and am currently a faculty associate of the Rutgers Program on South Asian Studies and the Center for Security, Race & Rights (Rutgers Law School). I am also a research associate of the International Migration Institute Network (IMI-n) based at the University of Amsterdam. My primary areas of research include immigration, nonprofit organizations, and the sociology of music. Through my research and teaching, I strive to unravel the embeddedness of social life in symbolic boundaries and group inequities. Accordingly, I am currently working on a number of projects, which investigate how symbolic boundaries premised on social categories of race, ethnicity, nativity, religion, and class, inform the structure and organization of immigrant integration as well as the production and performance of popular music.

      Past Research

      My earlier work explored how racial group differences are strongly associated with prestige hierarchies within self-employment in the United States (Chaudhary 2015). My doctoral research examined how different historical and institutional structures in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom, resulted in different configurations of Pakistani immigrant nonprofit organizations (Chaudhary 2018; Chaudhary & Guarnizo 2016). In this work I further explored how race, nationality, and religion intersect and manifest as an organizational-level stigma that constrains the capacities for Pakistani nonprofits to facilitate integration and transnational development (Chaudhary-forthcoming; Chaudhary and Moss 2019). Before coming to Rutgers, I held a Marie Curie Early Career Post-Doctoral Fellowship at the University of Oxford. At Oxford, I investigated how immigrants residing in Europe engage in domestic and homeland-oriented electoral politics (Chaudhary 2018). In addition, I have been working with a group of sociologists at the University of Texas on a series of papers that examine the effects of religiosity on Muslim-American attitudes towards politically motivated violence (Acevedo & Chaudhary 2015) and Muslim-American identity (Chaudhary et al. 2019).  

      Current Research

      In an effort to expand sociological understandings of the intersection of race, immigration, and culture, my new research consists of three studies, which investigate how symbolic boundaries tied to group ascriptions (i.e. race, nativity, nationality, etc.) affect the consumption, performance, and production of popular music in the United States. The first study examines how racial boundaries in the recording industry influenced the racialization of the electric guitar as well as music genres intrinsically linked to it. A second study historical data and secondary research to examine the various ways in which several popular genres of American music were created through immigrant collaboration with American-born musicians during the during the 20th century. Finally, a third project uses historical census data and qualitative methods to examine how symbolic boundaries of race and nativity affect the employment of musicians in the United States during two periods: 1) 1950 to 2000; and 2) 2008 to 2019. Together these projects share an analytic emphasis on the embeddedness and influence of symbolic boundaries on the creation, performance, production, and consumption of popular music.

  • Clarke, Lee

    • Portrait
    • Lee Clarke
    • Professor
    • Ph.D. State University of New York, Stony Brook, 1985
    • Email: lclarke@rci.rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, 113
    • Website: https://www.leeclarke.com/
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Professor of Sociology, writes about organizations, failure, disaster, risk communication, and the boundaries between politics and science. His last work, Worst Cases: Terror and Catastrophe in the Popular Imagination was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2006. Clarke is currently writing a book about how science and politics meet, and don’t meet, regarding the loss of America’s wetlands and the idea of “coastal restoration.”

      Please see Dr. Clarke's website for information about his research.

  • Davidson, Thomas

    • Portrait
    • Thomas Davidson
    • Assistant Professor
    • PhD. Cornell University, 2020
    • Email: thomas.davidson@rutgers.edu>
    • Office: Davison Hall
    • Website: https://www.thomasrdavidson.com/
    • Twitter: @thomasrdavidson
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Thomas Davidson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Rutgers University. He received his Ph.D. in Sociology from Cornell University in 2020. His research interests include political sociology, social movements, and the sociology of culture. Much of his research uses digital trace data from social media and other websites in combination with statistical analysis and computational methods including natural language processing and machine-learning.

      He is currently working on several projects related to political discussion on social media. In one of these projects he uses novel data on the Facebook pages of political parties across Europe to study the relationship between social media and electoral outcomes, in particular the extent to which radical right populists disproportionately benefit from these platforms. In addition to his work in political sociology, he is interested in using digital trace data to study online communities and careers in creative industries. In a current project he is examining the multiplex relations between musicians and what they reveal about the evolution of musical genres.

  • Dinzey-Flores, Zaire

    • Portrait
    • Zaire Dinzey-Flores
    • Associate Professor
    • PhD. University of Michigan, 2005
    • Email: zdinzey@rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, 119
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Associate Professor in Latino and Hispanic Caribbean Studies and Sociology, teaches courses on urbanism, Caribbean societies and development, race and ethnicity, and research methods. Her research interests are in the areas of urbanism, space and place, the built environment, race and ethnicity, social inequality, mixed-method research, criminal justice, Latin America and Caribbean Studies, and African Diaspora. Dinzey-Flores' research focuses on understanding how urban space mediates community life and race, class, and social inequality. She uses an interdisciplinary lens (sociology, urban planning, public policy), mixed-method approaches, and often a comparative Caribbean-U.S. framework, to investigate the processes that cement the built environment and unequally distribute power. She is particularly interested in housing and urban residential (housing and neighborhood) design: the underlying logics and policies that drive design, how design is interpreted, used, and experienced, and the consequences for inequality among communities and residents of cities.

      Her book, Locked In, Locked Out: Gated Communities in a Puerto Rican City (University Of Pennsylvania Press: 2013), winner of the 2014 Robert E. Park Award of the Community and Urban Sociology Section (CUSS) of the American Sociological Association and an Honorable Mention of the 2014 Frank Bonilla Book Award of the Puerto Rican Studies Association, examines race and class inequality as they are recreated, contained, and negotiated through urban policy, the physical built environment, and community gates in private and public housing.

      Dinzey-Flores is currently working on a number of projects: the first is a mixed-method examination of how race is articulated in residential real estate practices in demographically changing neighborhoods in Brooklyn, NY; the second, looks at the transatlantic circulation of housing planning and design ideals in the middle of the 20th Century. She is also collaborating on a mobile data project with department and university colleagues seeking to understand racial segregation as it occurs in motion and a mixed-media project on construction in the Caribbean.

  • Gerson, Judith

    • Portrait
    • Judith Gerson
    • Associate Professor
    • Ph.D. Cornell, 1979
    • Email: gerson@rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, 139
    • Phone: 848-932-7804
    • Judith Gerson holds a joint appointment in the Departments of Sociology and Women’s and Gender Studies, and is an affiliate faculty in Jewish Studies. She regularly teaches courses in gender theory; interdisciplinary research methods; narrative analysis; and diaspora, trauma, and collective memory. She has taught in the Gender Studies Program at Utrecht University in the Netherlands and was a visiting scholar at the Center for Women’s and Gender Research (SKOK) at the University of Bergen, Norway. In 2012, she received an award from the School of Arts and Sciences at Rutgers for her distinguished contributions to undergraduate education.

      Currently, she is completing a book manuscript tentatively titled, By Thanksgiving We Were Americans: German Jewish Refugees and Holocaust Memory. Focused on the forced emigration and resettlement of German Jews in the U.S. during World War II, the project relies on memoirs, interviews, and correspondence to examine how this group of refugees recalled, evaded, and forgot their past. She compares these personal testimonies to one another, the historiographic record, and to refugee aid organization documents to discern narrative patterns. She is the co-editor with Diane Wolf of Sociology Confronts the Holocaust: Memories and Identities in Jewish Diasporas (Duke University Press, 2007) and more recently has published on practices of masculinity among German Jewish immigrants, and on the relevance of gender theory in Jewish studies. A former research fellow at the Center for Advanced Holocaust Study at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM), in 2017 -2018, she was the Ina Levine Senior Invitational Scholar at the Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Study at the USHMM. In 2019, she co-taught the Silberman faculty seminar on Displacement, Migration, and the Holocaust at the USHMM. She regularly gives public lectures on collective memory and forgetting to various public gatherings of survivors of the Holocaust and their descendants.

  • Jones, Leslie Kay

    • Portrait
    • Leslie Kay Jones
    • Assistant Professor
    • Email: lv251@sociology.rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, 131
    • Dr. Leslie Kay Jones is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Rutgers New Brunswick, specializing in social movements. She draws extensively on the fields of race and gender, critical race theory, and online social media in her study of collective mobilization. She teaches qualitative and computer assisted research methods, particularly digital ethnography and content analysis.

      Leslie’s recent article, BlackLivesMatter: An Analysis of the Movement as Social Drama, proposes a theoretical model for the role of the Black Twitter counterpublic in mediating the frames of #BlackLivesMatter protests. Her working manuscript argues that Black women are forming intellectual salons through online social media, in which they are making groundbreaking theoretical contributions toward the public understanding of race and gender.

      Leslie is an interdisciplinary scholar that is active in the digital humanities and digital sociologies communities. She co-directs the Digital Sociology Collective with Drs. Rachel Durso (Washington College) and Francesca Tripodi (UNC).

      As a graduate student at the University of Pennsylvania, she held fellowships at the Andrea Mitchell Center for the Study of Democracy (2018-2019) and the Price Lab for Digital Humanities (2017-2018)

      In 2016, she began co-ordinating the Digital Sociology Mini-Conference as part of the Eastern Sociological Society annual meeting, an initiative first started in 2015 by Jessie Daniels, Karen Gregory, and Tressie McMillan Cottom. In 2020, the Digital Sociology Mini-Conference became the 1st Annual Digital Sociology unconference, independently hosted by the newly named Digital Sociology Collective.

  • Kempner, Joanna

    • Portrait
    • Joanna Kempner
    • Associate Professor
    • Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, 2004
    • Email: jkempner@sociology.rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, 134
    • Website: https://www.joannakempner.com/
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Joanna Kempner, associate professor of sociology at Rutgers University, works at the intersection of medicine, science, gender, and the body. Kempner’s research investigates knowledge production as cultural work, inscribed with and shaped by tacit cultural assumptions and social relations. Her award-winning book, Not Tonight: Migraine and the Politics of Gender and Health (Chicago 2014), examines the social values embedded in how we talk about, understand, and make policies for people in pain. Kempner is also on the vanguard of research investigating what we do not know, aka the social production of ignorance. She is currently writing a book that tracks the role that citizen scientists are playing in the reemergence of psychedelic medicine.

      Professor Kempner received her Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, participated in the Robert Wood Johnson Scholars in Health Policy Research Program and worked as a Research Associate at the Center for Health and Wellbeing at Princeton University. She has won several awards for her research, including the 2016 American Sociological Association’s Eliot Freidson award for Outstanding Publication in Medical Sociology, the 2016 Eileen Basker Memorial Prize, awarded by the Society for Medical Anthropology, and the Rutgers Board of Trustees Research Fellowship for Scholarly Excellence, one of Rutgers’ highest honors. She writes for a wide variety of audiences, publishing in journals like Science, Social Science & Medicine, Gender & Society, and Public Library of Science Medicine. You can follow her on twitter at @joannakempner or read about her work on her website at www.joannakempner.com.

  • Lee, Catherine

    • Portrait
    • Catherine Lee
    • Associate Professor
    • Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, 2003
    • Email: clee@sociology.rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, 141
    • Website: http://catherineylee.com/
    • Phone: 848-932-7807
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Catherine Lee is associate professor of sociology and faculty associate at the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research. As a political sociologist, she examines how meanings of race and ethnicity shape social relations and inequalities across three critical sites: immigration; science and medicine; and law and society. Catherine is the author of Fictive Kinship: Family Reunification and the Meaning of Race and Nation in American Immigration (2013, Russell Sage) and co-editor of Genetics and the Unsettled Past: The Collision of DNA, Race, and History (2012, Rutgers University Press). Her current projects include an investigation of the use of DNA testing in family reunification cases in the United States and Europe and of the meaning of diversity in U.S. biomedicine given shifting ethnic and racial demographics and the rise of multiraciality due to increased immigration.

  • MacKendrick, Norah

    • Portrait
    • Norah MacKendrick
    • Associate Professor
    • PhD, University of Toronto. 2011
    • Email: norah.mackendrick@rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, Room 107
    • Website: https://www.norahmackendrick.com/
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Norah MacKendrick’s research falls within the fields of medical sociology, environmental sociology, gender, science and technology studies, and consumer studies. In 2020 she became Chair-Elect of the Environmental Sociology section of the American Sociological Association.

      She is the author of Better Safe Than Sorry: How Consumers Navigate Exposure to Everyday Toxics, which identifies the rise of “precautionary consumption” in the United States. She finds that chemical body burdens are the consequence of decades of regulatory failure to properly assess the health consequences of environmental chemicals. The burden of addressing this failure has fallen to women and mothers who feel responsible for protecting their children from exposure to chemicals, and do so through cooking, grocery shopping, and management of the household. The book reveals how discourses of maternal responsibility and consumer empowerment circulate within the campaigns of environmental health advocacy groups, and as well as through the retail landscape for organic foods and ‘green’ products, particularly Whole Foods Market.

      In 2019, Better Safe Than Sorry won the Best First Book Award from the Association for the Study of Food & Society. In 2020, it won the Allan Schnaiberg Outstanding Publication Award from the Environmental Sociology section of the American Sociological Association.

      In her other research, MacKendrick has examined the intersections of risk, individualization and modern motherhood, as well as the dynamics of non-toxic consumption, “foodscapes” and science activism. Her research has been published in Gender & Society, Signs: the Journal of Women in Culture and Society, Sociological Forum, Journal of Consumer Culture, Food, Culture and Society and Contexts.

      MacKendrick is working on three new projects. The first examines the diffusion of endocrine disruptor theory into reproductive medicine. The second looks at the role of doctors in the wellness and self-help industries. And the third is a collaboration with Endia Louise Hayes on Black foodways and the alternative food movement.

  • McLean, Paul

    • Portrait
    • Paul McLean
    • Professor
    • Ph.D. University of Chicago, 1996
    • Email: pmclean@rci.rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, 133
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Professor of Sociology, teaches courses on sociological theory, network analysis, political and economic sociology, and the sociology of culture. Other interests include politics in early modern states, the network organization of the Renaissance economy, Adam Smith's social theory, and the culture of videogaming.

      Paul McLean's research has focused on exploring the connections between multiple kinds of social networks—marriage networks, economic networks, and political patronage networks chiefly—and describing the cultural practices and identities that actors adopt to move within and across these networks. He has examined the development of elaborate strategies of self-presentation and the emergence of a quasi-modern conception of the self in Renaissance Florence in articles (AJS 104: 51-91 [1998], CSSH 47: 638-64 [2005]) and in his book, The Art of the Network (Duke UP, 2007).

      His recent book, Culture in Networks (Polity, 2017) provides an overview of research on the culture-networks link across a variety of interfaces, both historical and contemporary—including research on diffusion, social movement mobilization, clientage structures, topic modelling, the formation of tastes, organizational cultures, and social media usage.

      Some of his work on Florence has been collaboratively produced, including studies of Florentine market structure and organizational emergence with John Padgett of the University of Chicago (T&S 26: 209-44 [1997], AJS 111: 1463-1568 [2006], Journal of Modern History 83: 1-47 [2011]), and work on the structure and 'logics' of interpersonal credit exchange with Neha Gondal of Boston University (Social Networks 35: 499-513 [2013], Poetics 41: 122-50 [2013], EJS/AES 55: 135-76 [2014]).  He is currently pursuing an interest in consumer credit in the Renaissance.

      In addition, McLean has examined the political organization of Polish elites in the early modern period (T&S 33: 167-212 [2004], Annals 636: 88-110 [2011]), looking at that organization and its evolution as the product of multiple-network dynamics.  More recent interests include the idea of chance in the Renaissance, the social theory of Adam Smith, networking dynamics and career trajectories in academia, divisiveness in contemporary American political culture, and the organization of videogame play (Soc Forum 27: 961-85 [2012]).

  • Salime, Zakia

    • Portrait
    • Zakia Salime
    • Associate Professor
    • Ph.D. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2005
    • Email: zsalime@rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, 137
    • Phone: 848-932-7798
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Zakia Salime teaches courses in feminist theory, gender, globalization, contemporary social theory, social movements, postcolonial theory. Salime’s book: Between Feminism and Islam: Human Rights and Sharia Law in Morocco (Minnesota, 2011) illustrates this interplay of global regimes of rights and local discourses by exploring the spaces of encounters of liberal feminism and Islamism in Morocco.  Her co-edited volume Freedom Without Permission: Bodies and Spaces in the Arab Revolutions (Duke, 2016) explores how bodies, subjectivities and memories were constituted and constitutive of sexed and gendered spaces during the North African and Middle Easter Uprisings of 2011. Salime’s current book manuscript explores global extractive modes of governance through the study of land-and-resource-grab in Morocco. The study unpacks the nexus of law, power, gender, and capital through attending to peasant populations' quotidian dealing with the state and its regimes of legality, citizenship, inclusion and exclusion.  Salime publications encompass a wide range of interests including urban youth protests and music, Islamophobia, war and racial politics in the U.S.

      My current book manuscript Seeing like a Woman: Land and Extractive Governance in Morocco foregrounds peasant women’s own understanding of the social and cultural transformations taking place in the context of intensified land privatization and extractivist governance. I write these stories by centering women’s daily dwelling to unpack the bureaucratic and legal regimes obstructing their access to land, the words through which they grapple with economic and social change, and the desireshopes, and pain through which they articulate the present and imagine the future. This project documents these hopes and desires as an integral part of the present history of neoliberal encounters. I understand this present history as messy and traversed with antagonistic meanings of value, place, legality, and gender. My ethnographic fieldwork and research help answering a set of questions: What do we learn about neoliberal encounters by listening to un-schooled, dispossessed yet resourceful rural women? What does women’s mobilization against land and resource privatization tell us about the hasty implementation of development projects, and the slow yet daily penetration of ‘rent’, and circulation of multiscalar capital? What do we learn about the state, its ‘verticality’, or ‘effects’ at this juncture of privatization and protests? What kind of legitimation and reconfiguration of political power takes place when women engage with the capitalist penetration of their local community? What kind of power and authority are strengthen and disrupted?

  • Shepherd, Hana

    • Portrait
    • Hana Shepherd
    • Assistant Professor
    • Ph.D. Princeton University, 2011
    • Email: hshepherd@sociology.rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, 037
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Assistant Professor of Sociology. Shepherd teaches classes in interventions and social change, organizations, and culture. She studies how social networks, social norms and group processes, culture, and organizations facilitate or impede social change. She is currently working on a series of projects on the enforcement of local labor law, and on social networks and low-wage work.

      Hana Shepherd's work focuses on three areas.

      • Social Networks, Norms, and Group Cultures

      Shepherd’s research examines how people perceive the social norms operating in their social groups, the effects of those perceptions on behavior, and how norm perceptions are shaped by social networks. She is interested in social norms as a central element of culture as they shape larger patterns of behavior in groups.

      As part of this work, Shepherd co-directed a year-long field experiment in 56 middle schools in New Jersey. Evidence of the effect of the intervention program on students' perceived norms of social conflict and on student behavior can be found in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences here. The program curriculum can be found here. Shepherd uses the dataset from this project (three types of network relations at two time points during the year for over 21,000 students) for a number of projects including the relationship between network structure and norm perceptions in schools, the adoption of different social media platforms (in Social Science Research with Jeff Lane), and the role of conflict in shaping social status in schools (with Laura Callejas).

      Her new work examines the formation and effects of network ties among low-wage workers.

      • · Cognitive and Social Psychological Accounts of Culture

      Shepherd uses tools from social and cognitive psychology, survey experiments, and other analytical methods to investigate the processes of culture and cognition. With Rutgers colleagues, she has studied the experiences of mobile segregation using implicit cognition measures.

      • · The Relationship between Organizations and Inequality

      Shepherd is co-PI with Janice Fine on a project funded by the Russell Sage Foundation examining how city agencies interpret and enforce local labor laws. She has also examined variation among organizations in how they implement new laws, using the case of schools and the NJ Anti-Bullying Bill of Rights. Her previous work in this area examines elites and foreign policy knowledge, racial discrimination, and classification in the World Bank.

      Shepherd uses diverse methods including network analysis, lab and field-based experiments, interviews, and archival research. She is particularly interested in various attempts at social change including social engineering, social movements, utopian scheming, and policy. Prior to joining the department, Professor Shepherd was a postdoctoral associate and lecturer at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and the Department of Psychology at Princeton University.

  • Stein, Arlene

    • Portrait
    • Arlene Stein
    • Distinguished Professor
    • Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, 1993
    • Email: arlenes@sociology.rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, 045
    • Twitter: @SteinArlene
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Arlene Stein’s research focuses on the intersection of gender, sexuality, culture, and politics. The author or editor of nine books, she received the American Sociological Association’s Simon and Gagnon Award for career contributions to the study of sexualities. She teaches courses on the sociology of gender and sexuality, culture, self and society, and trauma/memory, and writing within and beyond academia. She is the director of the Institute for Research on Women at Rutgers and serves on the graduate faculty of the Department of Women's and Gender Studies.

      Her latest book is Unbound: Transgender Men and the Transformation of Identity (Pantheon, 2018). She is also the author of The Stranger Next Door, an ethnography of a Christian conservative campaign against lesbian/gay rights, which explores clashing understandings of religion and sexuality in American culture; it received the Ruth Benedict Book Award. Her book Sex and Sensibility examines generational shifts in lesbian identities. Reluctant Witnesses: Survivors, Descendants, and the Rise of Holocaust Consciousness (Oxford, 2014), looks at how children of survivors became narrators of their parents’ stories of genocide. Going Public: A Guide for Social Scientists (J. Daniels, coauthor), is a guidebook for publicly engaged scholars.

  • Zerubavel, Eviatar

    • Portrait
    • Eviatar Zerubavel
    • Board of Governors and Distinguished Professor
    • Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, 1976
    • Email: zerubave@sociology.rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, 131
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Professor Zerubavel is Board of Governors Distinguished Professor of Sociology. His main areas of interest are cognitive sociology and the sociology of time. His latest six books explored the sociomental shape of the past, the social organization of silence and denial, the social construction of genealogical relatedness, the sociology of inattention, the phenomenology and semiotics of taken-for-grantedness, and the notion of a concept-driven sociology.

      His publications include Patterns of Time in Hospital Life: A Sociological Perspective (University of Chicago Press, 1979); Hidden Rhythms: Schedules and Calendars in Social Life (University of Chicago Press, 1981. Paperback – University of California Press, 1985. Japanese – 1984. Italian – 1985); The Seven-Day Circle: The History and Meaning of the Week (Free Press, 1985. Paperback – University of Chicago Press, 1989. Listed among Choice's Outstanding Academic Books – 1985); The Fine Line: Making Distinctions in Everyday Life (Free Press, 1991. Paperback – University of Chicago Press, 1993); Terra Cognita: The Mental Discovery of America (Rutgers University Press, 1992. Transaction – 2003); Social Mindscapes: An Invitation to Cognitive Sociology (Harvard University Press, 1997. Paperback – 1999. Norwegian – 2000. Persian – 2021); The Clockwork Muse: A Practical Guide to Writing Theses, Dissertations, and Books (Harvard University Press, 1999. Marathi – 2012); Time Maps: Collective Memory and the Social Shape of the Past (University of Chicago Press, 2003. Paperback – 2004. Italian – 2005); The Elephant in the Room: Silence and Denial in Everyday Life (Oxford University Press, 2006. Paperback – 2007. Chinese – 2008); Ancestors and Relatives: Genealogy, Identity, and Community (Oxford University Press, 2011. Paperback – 2013. Awarded Honorable mention in the 2012 PROSE Award ["Sociology and Social Work" category] by the Association of American Publishers); Hidden in Plain Sight: The Social Structure of Irrelevance (Oxford University Press, 2015); Taken for Granted: The Remarkable Power of the Unremarkable (Princeton University Press, 2018. Italian – 2019. Awarded the Charles Horton Cooley Award for Best Book by the Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction as well as the Susanne K. Langer Award for Outstanding Scholarship in the Ecology of Symbolic Form by the Media Ecology Association – 2019); and Generally Speaking: An Invitation to Concept-Driven Sociology (Oxford University Press, 2021).

      He is currently writing a book on impersonality in social life. Professor Zerubavel served from 1992 to 2001 and from 2006 to 2009 as the director of the Rutgers sociology graduate program. In 2000-01 he served as Chair of the Culture Section of the American Sociological Association. In 2003 he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship. In 2016 he received the Rutgers University Faculty Scholar-Teacher Award, and in 2017 he received the Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction’s Helena Lopata Mentor Excellence Award. He teaches graduate courses in cognitive sociology, time and memory, and sociological theory.