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  • Eda, Haruki

    • Portrait
    • Haruki Eda
    • Email: haruki.eda@rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, 012
    • Website: http://edacv.blogspot.com
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Hello! I'm a sociologist specialized in social movements, transnational migration, critical geopolitics, race and ethnicity, and gender/sexuality. My research concerns the issues of peace and security, sovereignty, and decolonization across Asia/Pacific and North America, and I'm trained in qualitative methods and queer theory to investigate how community organizing impacts geopolitical dynamics and identity construction. I'm working on a book project entitled Queer Unification: Community and Healing in the Korean Diaspora, which examines the possibilities and imaginations of Korean unification from the perspective of queer diasporic Koreans by centering their embodied experiences as a praxis of what I call geopolitical healing. My work has appeared in Research Justice: Methodologies for Social Change (Policy Press, 2015), Social Text Periscope, and Contemporary Archipelagic Thinking: Towards New Comparative Methodologies and Disciplinary Formations (Rowman & Littlefield, forthcoming). In addition to research, I enjoy teaching sociology, Asian American studies, Asian studies, and English composition. In the classroom, I focus on challenging my students by asking them critical questions about real-world problems rather than spoon-feeding easy answers. At Rutgers University, I'm also involved in the Asian American Cultural Center, where I teach a Living-Learning Community course (check out our Instagram Photovoice project). I believe that relevant education that activates the community leaders in ourselves is what this world needs for the 21st century, and I am committed to fostering my students' intellectual, professional, and political growth through collaborative learning. 

  • Enos, Jenny

    • Portrait
    • Jenny Enos
    • Email: jje75@scarletmail.rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, 044
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Jenny Enos received her B.A. in Sociology and Women's, Gender, & Sexuality Studies from Gettysburg College (2018) and her M.A. in Sociology from Rutgers University (2020). Her main research interests are anti-immigrant sentiment, ethnoracial bias, and extreme-right political parties in Europe. Jenny's M.A. thesis examined how increases in immigrants from Muslim-majority countries during the refugee crisis and unemployment rates led to increases in extreme-right voting in Sweden between 2014 and 2018, using the theory of "group threat". Her current and future research investigates the individual-level cognitive processes behind anti-immigrant sentiment and ethnoracial bias, in addition to how gender and sexuality play a role in constructing immigrant threat perceptions among Whites/natives.

  • Espinoza, Maria

    • Portrait
    • Maria Espinoza
    • Email: mespinoza@sociology.rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, 012
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • My research is in the fields of environmental sociology, medical sociology, and science and technology studies. My main interest is in how certain narratives about infectious diseases (e.g., the “outbreak narrative”) become the norm, prioritizing biotechnological fixes and shifting attention away from questions of social and environmental justice, public health infrastructure, and the lingering impact of economic reforms that enable disease to spread in the first place.

      For my dissertation project, I focus on the dengue epidemic that hit Peru in 2017 after the unexpected climate phenomenon El Niño Costero. Specifically, I’m investigating how public health experts communicate with decision-makers and diverse publics about the expansion of climate-sensitive diseases in the face of a changing climate. I aim to shed light on the challenges that public health professionals encounter when communicating about dengue risk and climate change, and on the technologies of legitimacy they rely on to render their claims legible to different publics.

      In addition to my dissertation project, I am working on a book with Melissa Aroncyzk, and Bob Brulle, titled The Climate of Publicity, for Oxford University Press. In this project we take a historical look at how promotional culture and environmental information systems have shaped environmental problems in the United States since the birth of the PR industry in the early twentieth century.

      During my time at Rutgers, I have been a graduate fellow at the Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis, participating in the 2015-2016 project “Ethical Subjects: Moralities, Laws, and Histories.”

      Prior to pursuing a doctoral degree, I earned a B.A. from the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru and an M.A. in Sociology from Syracuse University. I have also worked both in the social sector as a venture coordinator for Ashoka in the Andean Region and in the private sector as a consultant conducting social and environmental impact assessment studies.