Gender, Sexuality and Embodiment

Gender, Sexuality and Embodiment

  • brooks thumbAssociate Professor
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    Office: 132 George Street
    Office Phone: 732-445-7395

    Associate Professor in Women’s and Gender Studies and Sociology, teaches courses in comparative and historical sociology, globalization and postcolonial social formations.  Her research interests include the sociology of gender and labor, critical political economy, globalization, social movements, feminist theory, gender and development, consumption, comparative sociology, Central American studies, South Asian studies, nationalism, post-coloniality and critical race theory.  She is currently finishing a book on transnational organizing in the garment industry with a focus on Dhaka , San Salvador and New York City.

  • BzostekAssociate Professor
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    Office: Davison Hall, 135

    Associate Professor and Undergraduate Director of Sociology, currently teaches courses on social demography and advanced research methods. Her research interests focus on recent changes in family demography and their consequences for child and family well-being, as well as social disparities in health and health care.

       

  • gersonAssociate Professor
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    Office: Davison Hall, 139
    Office Phone: 848-932-7804

    Associate Professor of Sociology, teaches courses in collective memory, immigration, the aftermath of catastrophe, narrative, and gender. Her primary areas of interest include forced migration and the Holocaust, collective memory, narrative, gender, and contemporary social theory. Currently she is completing a book manuscript tentatively titled, By Thanksgiving We Were Americans: German Jewish Refugees and Holocaust Memory,which relies on memoirs, diaries and testimonies to unravel the complexities of how those who lived recall their past.  

      

  • kempner 2018Associate Professor
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    Office: Davison Hall, 134

    Joanna Kempner, associate professor of sociology, works at the intersection of medicine, science, gender, and the body. Kempner investigates the production of knowledge and ignorance as cultural work, inscribed with and shaped by tacit assumptions about social relations across gender, race, and class. Her award-winning book, Not Tonight: Migraine and the Politics of Gender and Health (Chicago 2014), examines the social values embedded in the way we talk about, understand, and make policies for people in pain. She is currently writing a book about citizen scientists who use psychedelic medicine to treat pain. She teaches courses on social problems, health and illness, and the sociology of the body.

  •  

    Fac Krivo LaurenProfessor
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    Office: Davison Hall, 111

    Professor of Sociology, teaches courses in race, crime, and community and in statistics for sociology. Her research focuses on race-ethnic differences in neighborhood crime, patterns and consequences of segregation, and spatial inequality. Her book with Ruth D. Peterson Divergent Social Worlds: Neighborhood Crime and the Racial-Spatial Dividewas published by the Russell Sage Foundation in 2010. She is currently examining patterns and sources of changing neighborhood inequality in crime after 2000 based on the second wave of the National Neighborhood Crime Study conducted with Christopher J. Lyons and María B. Vélez.

  • lee smallAssociate Professor
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    Office: Davison Hall, 141
    Office Phone: 848-932-7807

    Associate Professor of Sociology. Her research and teaching areas include race and ethnicity, gender, politics, immigration, law and society, and science and medicine. She is the author of Fictive Kinship: Family Reunification and the Meaning of Race and Nation in American Immigration and co-editor of Genetics and the Unsettled Past: The Collision of DNA, Race, and History.

  • mackendrickAssociate Professor
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    Office: Davison Hall,  Room107

    Associate Professor of Sociology, studies and teaches in the areas of environmental sociology, gender, sociology of food, consumer studies, science & technology studies, and medical sociology.  Author of Better Safe than Sorry: How Consumers Navigate Exposure to Everyday Toxics (University of California Press, 2018).

  • Fac Roos PatriciaProfessor   
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    Office: Davison Hall, 115

    Professor of Sociology, teaches courses in sociological writing; research methods; and inequalities. Two research projects currently occupy her time: occupational sex segregation since 2000 and grief and resilience in the midst of the opioid epidemic.

     

       

  • SalimeAssociate Professor
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    Office: Davison Hall, 137
    Office Phone: 848-932-7798

    Zakia Salime teaches courses in feminist theory, gender, globalization, contemporary social theory, social movements, postcolonial theory. Salime’s book: Between Feminism and Islam: Human Rights and Sharia Law in Morocco (Minnesota, 2011) illustrates this interplay of global regimes of rights and local discourses by exploring the spaces of encounters of liberal feminism and Islamism in Morocco.  Her co-edited volume Freedom Without Permission: Bodies and Spaces in the Arab Revolutions (Duke, 2016) explores how bodies, subjectivities and memories were constituted and constitutive of sexed and gendered spaces during the North African and Middle Easter Uprisings of 2011. Salime’s current book manuscript explores global extractive modes of governance through the study of land-and-resource-grab in Morocco. The study unpacks the nexus of law, power, gender, and capital through attending to peasant populations' quotidian dealing with the state and its regimes of legality, citizenship, inclusion and exclusion.  Salime publications encompass a wide range of interests including urban youth protests and music, Islamophobia, war and racial politics in the U.S.

  • Fac Springer KristenAssociate Professor
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    Office: Davison Hall, 040

    Associate Professor of Sociology, conducts research on gender, health, families, and aging. She is currently engaged in three broad research projects: 1) the gendered health effect of marital income across the life course, 2) the influence of masculinity ideals on men’s healthcare seeking behaviors, and 3) the interactive influence of biology and social environment for understanding gendered health. Professor Springer teaches advanced research methods, sociology of the family, and classes on incorporating biology and the social environment.

  • Fac Stein ArleneProfessor
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    Office: Davison Hall, 045

    Professor of sociology, specializing in the intersection of gender, sexuality, culture, and politics, and director of the Institute for Research on Women at Rutgers. The author or editor of nine books, she teaches courses on the sociology of gender and sexuality, culture, self and society, and trauma/memory, among other subjects. She serves on the graduate faculty of the Department of Women's and Gender Studies.