Global Structures

Global Structures

  • Brechin, Steven

    • Portrait
    • Steven Brechin
    • Professor and Graduate Program Director
    • Ph.D. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 1989
    • Email: steven.brechin@rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, 133
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Professor and Graduate Director of Sociology, Steve’s research explores some of the contours of a sociology of climate change – comparative/cross-national levels of public support, the required collective action by nation-states and the international community to address it, and the serious social justice issues that climate change generates. Current projects include critically understanding climate finance and development investments, both public and private in adaptation and mitigation, as well as the levels of cooperation required to make significant reductions in greenhouse gases.  

      Other projects include articulating Karl Polanyi’s environmental sociology and sustainable institutions built upon Polanyian thinking; investigating sustainable lifestyles in the U.S. – especially around the rapid development of organic farm to table movement in Northwestern Michigan – including its economic sustainability. With local collaborators, as well as students, Steve continues his decades’ long field research in Belize, Central America investigating the challenges to state-civil society relationships in ecological governance, and more recently on the country’s engagement with climate change - its domestic actions and international systems of support. This country-level examination helps to ground-truth his more international analysis.

      His earlier research focused on the sociology of biodiversity conservation, organized international reforestation programs, and environmentalisms.  Before arriving at Rutgers, Steve taught at Princeton, Michigan, Illinois, and Syracuse. He earned his graduate degrees from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

  • Brooks, Ethel

    • Portrait
    • Ethel Brooks
    • Associate Professor
    • Ph.D. New York University, 2000
    • Email: ethel.brooks@rutgers.edu
    • Office: 132 George Street
    • Phone: 732-445-7395
    • Dr. Brooks is an Associate Professor in Women’s and Gender Studies and Sociology, teaches courses in comparative and historical sociology, globalization and postcolonial social formations. She is currently finishing a book on transnational organizing in the garment industry with a focus on Dhaka , San Salvador and New York City.

      Dr. Brooks is interested in relations of gender, race, class, labor practices and nation-state formations, with a focus on South Asia, Central America and the United States. Her research explores areas of critical political economy, globalization, social movements, feminist theory, comparative sociology, nationalism, urban geographies and post-colonialism, with close attention to epistemology. In her dissertation, she examined three transnationally-organized protest movements for workers' rights in the global garment industry: (1) against poor working conditions in export-processing zones in El Salvador; (2) against the use of child labor in the Bangladesh garment industry; and (3) against immigrant sweatshops in New York City. Her work focuses on the relationship between protest organizers and the mostly women workers they represent, as part of the everyday manifestations of globalized production practices. She is currently working on a book that looks at transnational labor organizing, women's work and relations of globalization and empire.

      Dr. Brooks's recent and forthcoming publications include "Transnational Protest, Production and Women's Labor: The politics of sweatshops and the global garment industry," forthcoming in The Journal of International Labor and Working Class History, 2001; "Bangladesh's Garment Industry, Child Labor and Urban Sustainability," forthcoming in Saskia Sassen, ed., The Encyclopedia of Urban Sustainability, (UNESCO: 2001); "Globalized Chinese Capital in Central America," with Amy Freedman, in Asian Pacific Perspectives, May 2001; "Campañas transnacionales de protesta y la nueva división internacional de trabajo: Cuestiones de género en el sector maquila," in Apuntes de Investigación, November 2000; and "After the Wars: Cross-Border Organizing in Central America" with Winifred Tate in NACLA: Report on the Americas, Special Issue on Labor, January/February 1999. Her future projects include an examination of consumption practices and discourses of empire, gender and agrobusiness in Central America and South Asia and a critical study of Romanies and discursive formations of "gypsiness." Professor Brooks has a joint appointment with the Department of Women's and Gender Studies.

  • Chaudhary, Ali R.

    • Portrait
    • Ali R. Chaudhary
    • Assistant Professor
    • Ph.D. University of California, Davis
    • Email: ali.chaudhary@rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, 132B
    • Website: https://www.sociologistmusician.com/
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • I am an Assistant Professor of Sociology and am currently a faculty associate of the Rutgers Program on South Asian Studies and the Center for Security, Race & Rights (Rutgers Law School). I am also a research associate of the International Migration Institute Network (IMI-n) based at the University of Amsterdam. My primary areas of research include immigration, nonprofit organizations, and the sociology of music. Through my research and teaching, I strive to unravel the embeddedness of social life in symbolic boundaries and group inequities. Accordingly, I am currently working on a number of projects, which investigate how symbolic boundaries premised on social categories of race, ethnicity, nativity, religion, and class, inform the structure and organization of immigrant integration as well as the production and performance of popular music.

      Past Research

      My earlier work explored how racial group differences are strongly associated with prestige hierarchies within self-employment in the United States (Chaudhary 2015). My doctoral research examined how different historical and institutional structures in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom, resulted in different configurations of Pakistani immigrant nonprofit organizations (Chaudhary 2018; Chaudhary & Guarnizo 2016). In this work I further explored how race, nationality, and religion intersect and manifest as an organizational-level stigma that constrains the capacities for Pakistani nonprofits to facilitate integration and transnational development (Chaudhary-forthcoming; Chaudhary and Moss 2019). Before coming to Rutgers, I held a Marie Curie Early Career Post-Doctoral Fellowship at the University of Oxford. At Oxford, I investigated how immigrants residing in Europe engage in domestic and homeland-oriented electoral politics (Chaudhary 2018). In addition, I have been working with a group of sociologists at the University of Texas on a series of papers that examine the effects of religiosity on Muslim-American attitudes towards politically motivated violence (Acevedo & Chaudhary 2015) and Muslim-American identity (Chaudhary et al. 2019).  

      Current Research

      In an effort to expand sociological understandings of the intersection of race, immigration, and culture, my new research consists of three studies, which investigate how symbolic boundaries tied to group ascriptions (i.e. race, nativity, nationality, etc.) affect the consumption, performance, and production of popular music in the United States. The first study examines how racial boundaries in the recording industry influenced the racialization of the electric guitar as well as music genres intrinsically linked to it. A second study historical data and secondary research to examine the various ways in which several popular genres of American music were created through immigrant collaboration with American-born musicians during the during the 20th century. Finally, a third project uses historical census data and qualitative methods to examine how symbolic boundaries of race and nativity affect the employment of musicians in the United States during two periods: 1) 1950 to 2000; and 2) 2008 to 2019. Together these projects share an analytic emphasis on the embeddedness and influence of symbolic boundaries on the creation, performance, production, and consumption of popular music.

  • Dinzey-Flores, Zaire

    • Portrait
    • Zaire Dinzey-Flores
    • Associate Professor
    • PhD. University of Michigan, 2005
    • Email: zdinzey@rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, 119
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Associate Professor in Latino and Hispanic Caribbean Studies and Sociology, teaches courses on urbanism, Caribbean societies and development, race and ethnicity, and research methods. Her research interests are in the areas of urbanism, space and place, the built environment, race and ethnicity, social inequality, mixed-method research, criminal justice, Latin America and Caribbean Studies, and African Diaspora. Dinzey-Flores' research focuses on understanding how urban space mediates community life and race, class, and social inequality. She uses an interdisciplinary lens (sociology, urban planning, public policy), mixed-method approaches, and often a comparative Caribbean-U.S. framework, to investigate the processes that cement the built environment and unequally distribute power. She is particularly interested in housing and urban residential (housing and neighborhood) design: the underlying logics and policies that drive design, how design is interpreted, used, and experienced, and the consequences for inequality among communities and residents of cities.

      Her book, Locked In, Locked Out: Gated Communities in a Puerto Rican City (University Of Pennsylvania Press: 2013), winner of the 2014 Robert E. Park Award of the Community and Urban Sociology Section (CUSS) of the American Sociological Association and an Honorable Mention of the 2014 Frank Bonilla Book Award of the Puerto Rican Studies Association, examines race and class inequality as they are recreated, contained, and negotiated through urban policy, the physical built environment, and community gates in private and public housing.

      Dinzey-Flores is currently working on a number of projects: the first is a mixed-method examination of how race is articulated in residential real estate practices in demographically changing neighborhoods in Brooklyn, NY; the second, looks at the transatlantic circulation of housing planning and design ideals in the middle of the 20th Century. She is also collaborating on a mobile data project with department and university colleagues seeking to understand racial segregation as it occurs in motion and a mixed-media project on construction in the Caribbean.

  • Salime, Zakia

    • Portrait
    • Zakia Salime
    • Associate Professor
    • Ph.D. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2005
    • Email: zsalime@rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, 137
    • Phone: 848-932-7798
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Zakia Salime teaches courses in feminist theory, gender, globalization, contemporary social theory, social movements, postcolonial theory. Salime’s book: Between Feminism and Islam: Human Rights and Sharia Law in Morocco (Minnesota, 2011) illustrates this interplay of global regimes of rights and local discourses by exploring the spaces of encounters of liberal feminism and Islamism in Morocco.  Her co-edited volume Freedom Without Permission: Bodies and Spaces in the Arab Revolutions (Duke, 2016) explores how bodies, subjectivities and memories were constituted and constitutive of sexed and gendered spaces during the North African and Middle Easter Uprisings of 2011. Salime’s current book manuscript explores global extractive modes of governance through the study of land-and-resource-grab in Morocco. The study unpacks the nexus of law, power, gender, and capital through attending to peasant populations' quotidian dealing with the state and its regimes of legality, citizenship, inclusion and exclusion.  Salime publications encompass a wide range of interests including urban youth protests and music, Islamophobia, war and racial politics in the U.S.

      My current book manuscript Seeing like a Woman: Land and Extractive Governance in Morocco foregrounds peasant women’s own understanding of the social and cultural transformations taking place in the context of intensified land privatization and extractivist governance. I write these stories by centering women’s daily dwelling to unpack the bureaucratic and legal regimes obstructing their access to land, the words through which they grapple with economic and social change, and the desireshopes, and pain through which they articulate the present and imagine the future. This project documents these hopes and desires as an integral part of the present history of neoliberal encounters. I understand this present history as messy and traversed with antagonistic meanings of value, place, legality, and gender. My ethnographic fieldwork and research help answering a set of questions: What do we learn about neoliberal encounters by listening to un-schooled, dispossessed yet resourceful rural women? What does women’s mobilization against land and resource privatization tell us about the hasty implementation of development projects, and the slow yet daily penetration of ‘rent’, and circulation of multiscalar capital? What do we learn about the state, its ‘verticality’, or ‘effects’ at this juncture of privatization and protests? What kind of legitimation and reconfiguration of political power takes place when women engage with the capitalist penetration of their local community? What kind of power and authority are strengthen and disrupted?