Health, Population and the Life Course

Health, Population and the Life Course

  • BzostekAssociate Professor
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    Office: Davison Hall, 135

    Associate Professor and Undergraduate Director of Sociology, currently teaches courses on social demography and advanced research methods. Her research interests focus on recent changes in family demography and their consequences for child and family well-being, as well as social disparities in health and health care.

       

  • pcarrAssociate Professor
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    Office: Davison Hall, 109
    Office Phone: 848-932-7631

    Carr writes about crime and policing, youth and social control, and the transition to adulthood. He is the author of Clean Streets: Controlling Crime, Maintaining Order and Building Community Activism https://smile.amazon.com/Patrick-Carr-Controlling-Maintaining-Community/dp/B00HTJWAIK/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=Clean+Streets%3A+Controlling+Crime&qid=1560781550&s=books&sr=1-1 (NYU Press, 2005) and  Hollowing Out the Middle: the Rural Brain Drain and What it Means for America (Beacon, 2009).  Currently, he is writing a book about the experiences of young adults after the Great Recession, and he is co-Principal Investigator on a project that  examines the role of witnesses in the criminal justice system.

  • kempner 2018Associate Professor
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    Office: Davison Hall, 134

    Joanna Kempner, associate professor of sociology, works at the intersection of medicine, science, gender, and the body. Kempner investigates the production of knowledge and ignorance as cultural work, inscribed with and shaped by tacit assumptions about social relations across gender, race, and class. Her award-winning book, Not Tonight: Migraine and the Politics of Gender and Health (Chicago 2014), examines the social values embedded in the way we talk about, understand, and make policies for people in pain. She is currently writing a book about citizen scientists who use psychedelic medicine to treat pain. She teaches courses on social problems, health and illness, and the sociology of the body.

  • lee smallAssociate Professor
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    Office: Davison Hall, 141
    Office Phone: 848-932-7807

    Associate Professor of Sociology. Her research and teaching areas include race and ethnicity, gender, politics, immigration, law and society, and science and medicine. She is the author of Fictive Kinship: Family Reunification and the Meaning of Race and Nation in American Immigration and co-editor of Genetics and the Unsettled Past: The Collision of DNA, Race, and History.

  • Lei LeiAssistant Professor
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    Office: Davison Hall, 039

     

    Assistant Professor of sociology. Her broad research and teaching interests include health, family, demography, and urban sociology. She has studied the impact of neighborhood social and physical environment on the health and well-being of children and adults in different societies. Her current research focuses on how male out-migration influences the health and nutrition of left-behind wives and children in India.

  • Jackie LittProfessor
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    Dean, Douglass Residential College, 125 George St., New Brunswick, NJ 08901

    Professor of Sociology

    Jacquelyn Litt is Dean of Douglass Residential College and Campus, as well as Professor of Sociology and Women’s and Gender Studies. Her primary research has been on motherhood, carework, and inequality.  She has also done extensive work as an administrator to support women and enhance the number of women pursuing STEM research in American higher education.

       

  • mackendrickAssociate Professor
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    Office: Davison Hall,  Room107

    Associate Professor of Sociology, studies and teaches in the areas of environmental sociology, gender, sociology of food, consumer studies, science & technology studies, and medical sociology.  Author of Better Safe than Sorry: How Consumers Navigate Exposure to Everyday Toxics (University of California Press, 2018).

  • Professor
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    Office: Davison Hall, 101C

    Professor and Chair of Sociology, specializing in demography and its intersection with health outcomes and different forms of lethal violence. Her current research examines the sharp increase in suicide in the United States and how and why suicide risk varies over the life course and across birth cohorts.  Professor Phillips teaches courses in population studies, health, research methods, statistics, and criminology.    

  • Fac Springer KristenAssociate Professor
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    Office: Davison Hall, 040

    Associate Professor of Sociology, conducts research on gender, health, families, and aging. She is currently engaged in three broad research projects: 1) the gendered health effect of marital income across the life course, 2) the influence of masculinity ideals on men’s healthcare seeking behaviors, and 3) the interactive influence of biology and social environment for understanding gendered health. Professor Springer teaches advanced research methods, sociology of the family, and classes on incorporating biology and the social environment.