Organizations, Networks, and Work

Organizations, Networks, and Work

  • Brooks, Ethel

    • Portrait
    • Ethel Brooks
    • Associate Professor
    • Ph.D. New York University, 2000
    • Email: ethel.brooks@rutgers.edu
    • Office: 132 George Street
    • Phone: 732-445-7395
    • Dr. Brooks is an Associate Professor in Women’s and Gender Studies and Sociology, teaches courses in comparative and historical sociology, globalization and postcolonial social formations. She is currently finishing a book on transnational organizing in the garment industry with a focus on Dhaka , San Salvador and New York City.

      Dr. Brooks is interested in relations of gender, race, class, labor practices and nation-state formations, with a focus on South Asia, Central America and the United States. Her research explores areas of critical political economy, globalization, social movements, feminist theory, comparative sociology, nationalism, urban geographies and post-colonialism, with close attention to epistemology. In her dissertation, she examined three transnationally-organized protest movements for workers' rights in the global garment industry: (1) against poor working conditions in export-processing zones in El Salvador; (2) against the use of child labor in the Bangladesh garment industry; and (3) against immigrant sweatshops in New York City. Her work focuses on the relationship between protest organizers and the mostly women workers they represent, as part of the everyday manifestations of globalized production practices. She is currently working on a book that looks at transnational labor organizing, women's work and relations of globalization and empire.

      Dr. Brooks's recent and forthcoming publications include "Transnational Protest, Production and Women's Labor: The politics of sweatshops and the global garment industry," forthcoming in The Journal of International Labor and Working Class History, 2001; "Bangladesh's Garment Industry, Child Labor and Urban Sustainability," forthcoming in Saskia Sassen, ed., The Encyclopedia of Urban Sustainability, (UNESCO: 2001); "Globalized Chinese Capital in Central America," with Amy Freedman, in Asian Pacific Perspectives, May 2001; "Campañas transnacionales de protesta y la nueva división internacional de trabajo: Cuestiones de género en el sector maquila," in Apuntes de Investigación, November 2000; and "After the Wars: Cross-Border Organizing in Central America" with Winifred Tate in NACLA: Report on the Americas, Special Issue on Labor, January/February 1999. Her future projects include an examination of consumption practices and discourses of empire, gender and agrobusiness in Central America and South Asia and a critical study of Romanies and discursive formations of "gypsiness." Professor Brooks has a joint appointment with the Department of Women's and Gender Studies.

  • Chaudhary, Ali R.

    • Portrait
    • Ali R. Chaudhary
    • Assistant Professor
    • Ph.D. University of California, Davis
    • Email: ali.chaudhary@rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, 132B
    • Website: https://www.sociologistmusician.com/
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • I am an Assistant Professor of Sociology and am currently a faculty associate of the Rutgers Program on South Asian Studies and the Center for Security, Race & Rights (Rutgers Law School). I am also a research associate of the International Migration Institute Network (IMI-n) based at the University of Amsterdam. My primary areas of research include immigration, nonprofit organizations, and the sociology of music. Through my research and teaching, I strive to unravel the embeddedness of social life in symbolic boundaries and group inequities. Accordingly, I am currently working on a number of projects, which investigate how symbolic boundaries premised on social categories of race, ethnicity, nativity, religion, and class, inform the structure and organization of immigrant integration as well as the production and performance of popular music.

      Past Research

      My earlier work explored how racial group differences are strongly associated with prestige hierarchies within self-employment in the United States (Chaudhary 2015). My doctoral research examined how different historical and institutional structures in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom, resulted in different configurations of Pakistani immigrant nonprofit organizations (Chaudhary 2018; Chaudhary & Guarnizo 2016). In this work I further explored how race, nationality, and religion intersect and manifest as an organizational-level stigma that constrains the capacities for Pakistani nonprofits to facilitate integration and transnational development (Chaudhary-forthcoming; Chaudhary and Moss 2019). Before coming to Rutgers, I held a Marie Curie Early Career Post-Doctoral Fellowship at the University of Oxford. At Oxford, I investigated how immigrants residing in Europe engage in domestic and homeland-oriented electoral politics (Chaudhary 2018). In addition, I have been working with a group of sociologists at the University of Texas on a series of papers that examine the effects of religiosity on Muslim-American attitudes towards politically motivated violence (Acevedo & Chaudhary 2015) and Muslim-American identity (Chaudhary et al. 2019).  

      Current Research

      In an effort to expand sociological understandings of the intersection of race, immigration, and culture, my new research consists of three studies, which investigate how symbolic boundaries tied to group ascriptions (i.e. race, nativity, nationality, etc.) affect the consumption, performance, and production of popular music in the United States. The first study examines how racial boundaries in the recording industry influenced the racialization of the electric guitar as well as music genres intrinsically linked to it. A second study historical data and secondary research to examine the various ways in which several popular genres of American music were created through immigrant collaboration with American-born musicians during the during the 20th century. Finally, a third project uses historical census data and qualitative methods to examine how symbolic boundaries of race and nativity affect the employment of musicians in the United States during two periods: 1) 1950 to 2000; and 2) 2008 to 2019. Together these projects share an analytic emphasis on the embeddedness and influence of symbolic boundaries on the creation, performance, production, and consumption of popular music.

  • Clarke, Lee

    • Portrait
    • Lee Clarke
    • Professor
    • Ph.D. State University of New York, Stony Brook, 1985
    • Email: lclarke@rci.rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, 113
    • Website: https://www.leeclarke.com/
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Professor of Sociology, writes about organizations, failure, disaster, risk communication, and the boundaries between politics and science. His last work, Worst Cases: Terror and Catastrophe in the Popular Imagination was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2006. Clarke is currently writing a book about how science and politics meet, and don’t meet, regarding the loss of America’s wetlands and the idea of “coastal restoration.”

      Please see Dr. Clarke's website for information about his research.

  • Davidson, Thomas

    • Portrait
    • Thomas Davidson
    • Assistant Professor
    • PhD. Cornell University, 2020
    • Email: thomas.davidson@rutgers.edu>
    • Office: Davison Hall
    • Website: https://www.thomasrdavidson.com/
    • Twitter: @thomasrdavidson
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Thomas Davidson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Rutgers University. He received his Ph.D. in Sociology from Cornell University in 2020. His research interests include political sociology, social movements, and the sociology of culture. Much of his research uses digital trace data from social media and other websites in combination with statistical analysis and computational methods including natural language processing and machine-learning.

      He is currently working on several projects related to political discussion on social media. In one of these projects he uses novel data on the Facebook pages of political parties across Europe to study the relationship between social media and electoral outcomes, in particular the extent to which radical right populists disproportionately benefit from these platforms. In addition to his work in political sociology, he is interested in using digital trace data to study online communities and careers in creative industries. In a current project he is examining the multiplex relations between musicians and what they reveal about the evolution of musical genres.

  • Friedman, Brittany

    • Portrait
    • Brittany Friedman
    • Assistant Professor
    • Ph.D., Northwestern University in 2018
    • Email: bmf94@rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall 043
    • Website: https://www.brittanyfriedman.com/
    • Brittany Friedman is an Assistant Professor of Sociology and Faculty Affiliate of the Program in Criminal Justice and the Center for Security, Race, and Rights at Rutgers University. She is a 2019 Fellow of the Racial, Democracy, Crime and Justice Network (RDCJN). Friedman holds a Ph.D. in Sociology from Northwestern University and researches race and prison order, penal policy, and the intersections between institutions and monetary sanctions in the criminal justice system. Her first book, Born in Blood: Death Work, White Power, and the Rise of the Black Guerilla Family (under contract, The University of North Carolina Press JPP Series), traces the institutionalization of control strategies designed to eradicate Black political protest and the resulting consequences for the prison social system. The research is supported by the National Science Foundation, the American Society of Criminology, and the Kellogg School of Management.

      Friedman is a member of the Multi-State Study of Monetary Sanctions, researching how monetary sanctions in the criminal justice system impact reentry, racial inequality, and poverty.

      With April Fernandes and Gabriela Kirk, she is Co-PI of a comparative study of inmate reimbursement practices, also known as “pay-to-stay.” Their funded project expands the study of monetary sanctions to include empirical analyses of pay-to-stay as revenue generation.

  • Mai, Quan

    • Portrait
    • Quan Mai
    • Assistant Professor
    • PhD, Vanderbilt University in 2018
    • Email: quan.mai@sociology.rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, 049
    • Website: https://www.quandmai.com/
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Quan D. Mai is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Rutgers University. He received his Ph.D. in Sociology from Vanderbilt University in 2018. Dr. Mai’s research and teaching interests include work & occupations, social stratification, social movements, research methods, and environmental sociology. His scholarship focuses on how a range of social relations—including employment relations, race-ethnic relations, state regulatory capacity, and social movements—combine in the economy, polity, and in urban spaces to influence processes of social stratification. His current projects explore various consequences of nonstandard employment for workers’ labor market outcomes and socioeconomic well-being.

      He is a sociologist studying how work, race, and space shape various dimensions of social inequality in the labor market. His recent publications analyze the institutional drivers of work precarity in a cross-national setting. His current research examines how the experience of nonstandard employment shapes various aspects of workers’ lives, including their well-being and labor market prospects. In another related line of research, he explores the interaction between multiple media platforms, political institutions, and social movements. His research has appeared or is forthcoming in Social ForcesSocial Science & Medicine, Research in the Sociology of Work, Labor History, ​and other academic journals.

  • McLean, Paul

    • Portrait
    • Paul McLean
    • Professor
    • Ph.D. University of Chicago, 1996
    • Email: pmclean@rci.rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, 133
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Professor of Sociology, teaches courses on sociological theory, network analysis, political and economic sociology, and the sociology of culture. Other interests include politics in early modern states, the network organization of the Renaissance economy, Adam Smith's social theory, and the culture of videogaming.

      Paul McLean's research has focused on exploring the connections between multiple kinds of social networks—marriage networks, economic networks, and political patronage networks chiefly—and describing the cultural practices and identities that actors adopt to move within and across these networks. He has examined the development of elaborate strategies of self-presentation and the emergence of a quasi-modern conception of the self in Renaissance Florence in articles (AJS 104: 51-91 [1998], CSSH 47: 638-64 [2005]) and in his book, The Art of the Network (Duke UP, 2007).

      His recent book, Culture in Networks (Polity, 2017) provides an overview of research on the culture-networks link across a variety of interfaces, both historical and contemporary—including research on diffusion, social movement mobilization, clientage structures, topic modelling, the formation of tastes, organizational cultures, and social media usage.

      Some of his work on Florence has been collaboratively produced, including studies of Florentine market structure and organizational emergence with John Padgett of the University of Chicago (T&S 26: 209-44 [1997], AJS 111: 1463-1568 [2006], Journal of Modern History 83: 1-47 [2011]), and work on the structure and 'logics' of interpersonal credit exchange with Neha Gondal of Boston University (Social Networks 35: 499-513 [2013], Poetics 41: 122-50 [2013], EJS/AES 55: 135-76 [2014]).  He is currently pursuing an interest in consumer credit in the Renaissance.

      In addition, McLean has examined the political organization of Polish elites in the early modern period (T&S 33: 167-212 [2004], Annals 636: 88-110 [2011]), looking at that organization and its evolution as the product of multiple-network dynamics.  More recent interests include the idea of chance in the Renaissance, the social theory of Adam Smith, networking dynamics and career trajectories in academia, divisiveness in contemporary American political culture, and the organization of videogame play (Soc Forum 27: 961-85 [2012]).

  • Shepherd, Hana

    • Portrait
    • Hana Shepherd
    • Assistant Professor
    • Ph.D. Princeton University, 2011
    • Email: hshepherd@sociology.rutgers.edu
    • Office: Davison Hall, 037
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Assistant Professor of Sociology. Shepherd teaches classes in interventions and social change, organizations, and culture. She studies how social networks, social norms and group processes, culture, and organizations facilitate or impede social change. She is currently working on a series of projects on the enforcement of local labor law, and on social networks and low-wage work.

      Hana Shepherd's work focuses on three areas.

      • Social Networks, Norms, and Group Cultures

      Shepherd’s research examines how people perceive the social norms operating in their social groups, the effects of those perceptions on behavior, and how norm perceptions are shaped by social networks. She is interested in social norms as a central element of culture as they shape larger patterns of behavior in groups.

      As part of this work, Shepherd co-directed a year-long field experiment in 56 middle schools in New Jersey. Evidence of the effect of the intervention program on students' perceived norms of social conflict and on student behavior can be found in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences here. The program curriculum can be found here. Shepherd uses the dataset from this project (three types of network relations at two time points during the year for over 21,000 students) for a number of projects including the relationship between network structure and norm perceptions in schools, the adoption of different social media platforms (in Social Science Research with Jeff Lane), and the role of conflict in shaping social status in schools (with Laura Callejas).

      Her new work examines the formation and effects of network ties among low-wage workers.

      • · Cognitive and Social Psychological Accounts of Culture

      Shepherd uses tools from social and cognitive psychology, survey experiments, and other analytical methods to investigate the processes of culture and cognition. With Rutgers colleagues, she has studied the experiences of mobile segregation using implicit cognition measures.

      • · The Relationship between Organizations and Inequality

      Shepherd is co-PI with Janice Fine on a project funded by the Russell Sage Foundation examining how city agencies interpret and enforce local labor laws. She has also examined variation among organizations in how they implement new laws, using the case of schools and the NJ Anti-Bullying Bill of Rights. Her previous work in this area examines elites and foreign policy knowledge, racial discrimination, and classification in the World Bank.

      Shepherd uses diverse methods including network analysis, lab and field-based experiments, interviews, and archival research. She is particularly interested in various attempts at social change including social engineering, social movements, utopian scheming, and policy. Prior to joining the department, Professor Shepherd was a postdoctoral associate and lecturer at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and the Department of Psychology at Princeton University.