COVID-19 Update

Rutgers University has moved teaching online for the remainder of the semester. For all those enrolled in classes, all instructors should have provided you with information on how to best contact them during this period. If you have more general departmental inquiries, please contact one of us using the email addresses below. Take care, all.

Department Chair: Julie Phillips, Email: soc-chair@sociology.rutgers.edu
Graduate Director: Steven Brechin, Email: gpd@sociology.rutgers.edu
Undergraduate Director: Sharon Bzostek, Email: ug-dir@sociology.rutgers.edu
Senior Department Administrator: Lisa Iorillo, Email: liorillo@sociology.rutgers.edu
Graduate Program Coordinator: Marie Ferguson, Email: meferguson@sociology.rutgers.edu
Undergraduate Administrative Assistant: Carissa Nadonley, Email: undergrad-soc@sociology.rutgers.edu

Affiliated Graduate Program Faculty

O'Neill, Karen M.

Faculty ONeillAssociate Professor
Department of Human Ecology

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Phone: 848-932-9208
Curriculum Vitae

Karen M. O’Neill is a sociologist who studies how policies about land and water affect government power, the status of experts, and the well-being of various social groups. She has researched biodiversity protections in the urban plans of large cities around the world, local slow growth and pro-growth movements and policies in small towns, river flood control, and coastal storm vulnerability and hazard reduction. Karen has written or co-edited books on the rise of the U.S. program for river flood control and growth of government power (Duke University Press), on race and Hurricane Katrina (Rutgers University Press), and on changes in institutions in response to Hurricane Sandy (Rutgers University Press). She is a member of teams in two international competitions for coastal resilience designs, one for the New Jersey shore after Hurricane Sandy, under the Rebuild by Design competition (finalist team), and the second to use the Mississippi River to replenish coastal land in Louisiana, under the Changing Course competition (one of three winning teams).