Doctoral Students

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Ahn, Changhye

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Office: Davison Hall, 108

Changhye’s research interests include gender, migration, race/ethnicity, and sexuality. She is currently studying the influence of South Korea’s gendered migration policy on migrant women’s vulnerability and racialized sex trade. She received her B.A. in Sociology from University of Seoul and her M.A. in Sociology from Chung-Ang University. Her master’s thesis analyzes the ways in which Korean migration policy hierarchically constructs migrant groups based on gender, nationality, ethnicity, and political economic status of the country of origin. She has worked as a researcher for National Solidarity against Sexual Exploitation of Women and as an activist at Dasi Hamkke counseling center for victims of sex-trafficking. 

Allen-Kyle, Portia

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Office: Davison Hall, 119

Arthur, Elizabeth

Elizabeth Arhtur

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Office: Davison Hall, 044

Liz’s primary interest is in cognitive sociology, with particular emphasis on culture, identity, and morality. Her past research explored how individuals and groups actively managed “deviant” identities in response to shifting public attitudes. She earned her B.A. in Sociology from Pepperdine University.

Baffoe-Bonnie, Marilyn S.

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Office: Davison Hall, 105-1

Marilyn S. Baffoe-Bonnie is a first-year doctoral student in the Department of Sociology studying health, population, and life course. Her research focuses on bioethics, biotechnology, health disparities, and immigration. Her prior work is published in Bioethics and investigated the social and ethical impact of CRISPR/Cas9 on the sickle cell community in the United States. Marilyn holds a Master of Bioethics from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (2017) and a Bachelor of Science in Psychology from Haverford College (2016).

Bailey, John

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Office: Davison Hall, 020

John's primary interests include gender, sexuality, culture, and technology studies. In the past, he has studied how young men construct masculinity in online communities, and how gendered identities facilitate symbolic violence in digital space. He completed his B.A. in English and Sociology at the University of Connecticut, and his M.A. in Sociology at the University of Michigan.

Beck-McField, Armani

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Office: Davison Hall, 108

Armani Beck-McField is interested in the construction and maintenance of race, gender, and sexuality in contemporary U.S. society. Her research focuses on the intersecting complexities of transgender identity, maleness, and race. At present she is conducting interviews with trans men about their experiences navigating privilege and systems of oppression. Armani is extremely passionate about educating scholars at the undergraduate level, specifically in courses related to gender and sexuality. Armani has earned a B.A. in Psychology and a Certificate in Sexuality and Gender Studies from The Pennsylvania State University, University Park (2014), and an M.Ed. in Human Sexuality from Widener University (2016). 

Callejas, Laura Maria

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Curriculum Vitae

Office: Davison Hall, 108

Laura received her B.A (Sociology and Women and Gender Studies) and her M.A. in the Sociology department at Rutgers University-New Brunswick.  For her Master's thesis she examined where racial/ethnic minority students go for college-entrance information and how that information impacts their chances of applying to college. As a research assistant she has done work examining the racial/ethnic and gender composition of student fans at college football games as well as providing statistical assistance on a project looking at gender and racial/ethnic inequality in faculty promotion and pay at Rutgers University. For her dissertation work Laura is using network data to examine the relationship between conflict and social status mobility in middle schools. 

Catone (Mueller), Andrea

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Bridging sociology, psychology, and molecular biology, Andrea Catone’s research illuminates how the effects of trauma get transmitted within families. Her dissertation examines the extent to which parenting practices, ranging from neglect to over-attachment, trigger epigenetic changes in genes that regulate offspring’s mental health. She aims to identify and target factors that would alleviate the consequences of trauma, child abuse, and neglect. Andrea is the recipient of an AAUW American Dissertation Fellowship for the 2016-17 award year.

Andrea’s areas of interest include social movement networks, data science, cognition and culture, social genomics and epigenetics, neuroscience, ethnography, and narrative analysis. Andrea’s experience and training make her equally adept at analyzing micro-interaction and big data with the ability to switch between scopes with agility.  In addition to her dissertation, Andrea recently researched the role of the future in memory, the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, social movement network dynamics, and intergenerational transmission of trauma. She was also a Graduate Associate with the Center for European Studies at Rutgers University. Andrea previously studied philosophy at Rutgers University, where she received her BA, as well as at Humboldt Universität Berlin during her Fulbright Fellowship year. Andrea is the co-founder of Action Together New Jersey and Action Together Network.

Chang, Yung-Ying

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Curriculum Vitae

Office: Davison Hall, 105-2

Yung-Ying received her B.A and M.A in Sociology at National Taiwan University. She had studied the unintentional interaction of nationalist politic and popular culture in Taiwan with the approach of everyday nationhood to understand the intersection of East-Asian geopolitics and changing national identity of people there. She is looking forward to bridging her existed research to deeper and broader research project in the future, in which the populism, the return of right-wings, and the conservative regimes in Euro-American areas will be concerned. She had used diverse mix of qualitative, historical, and text-mining (by R Language) methods in previous studies, and is opening to other various research methods. Her influence in Chinese, English, and Korean is beneficial to conducting comparative research. Researchers interested in nations and nationalism, identity politics, banal/everyday nationalism, cultural politics, political culture, digital politics, social media, popular culture, fandom politics, East-Asian comparative studies, populism, and the right-wing politics are welcomed to contact and discuss with her.

Crawley, Kayla

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Office: Davison Hall, 012

Kayla J. Crawley's research interests include the intersection of race and education policy, school discipline and the school-to-prison pipeline. Her Master's thesis focuses on the historical underpinnings of school discipline policy in Virginia, and the barriers to reform. Her dissertation will focus on school discipline policy alternatives in New Jersey, using Karate dojos as a comparative case. She earned her B.A. in political science from the University of Pennsylvania.

Daghagheleh, Aghil

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Office: Davison Hall, 048

Aghil Daghagheleh is a Ph.D. candidate at the Department of Sociology, Rutgers University. He is currently a graduate fellow at the Center for Cultural Analysis at Rutgers University (CCA) and recently finished a project on social movements and electoral politics in Iran. In his current research project, "Refusal: Resistance, Subjectivity, and Construction of Arabness in Iran," Aghil explores the geography of social marginalization in contemporary Iran, a topic which brings together research on the politics of marginalized communities, social movements, race and ethnic relations, nationalism, political economy, religion, and resistance. Through an ethnographic study of the everyday experiences and politics of Arab minority, Aghil shows how ethnicity becomes a significant facet of subaltern politics and explores modalities of resistance, subversion, negotiation, and refusal that marginalized communities deploy to cope with the effects of ethnoreligious nationalism and to unsettle ethnicity, nationhood, and citizenship, as major products of state classification. He problematizes the notions of citizenship and belonging in the Islamic Republic by highlighting the work of classification in perpetuating structures of power and forms of everyday domination and resistance. Aghil is also participating in a comparative research project, "The Rise of The Peripheral," that explores the conflicts about the extraction of natural resources that are increasingly expressed in indigenous, ethnic, racial, and decolonial terms. He works with Dr. Zakia Salime (Rutgers) to examines the collective and individual forms of resistance at the nexus of neoliberal economics and political authoritarianism in the United States, Morocco, and Iran.

DelGenio, Kathryn

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Office: Davison Hall, 105-3  

I’m a first-year doctoral student, and am broadly interested in relationships between white supremacy, nationalism, collective memory, identity, and emotions. My research questions center an examination of narrative productions of meaning and their material and political consequences. Particularly, I am interested in studying historical preservation and collective remembering in the American South with the goal of identifying hegemonic reproductions of white supremacy and nationalism. I pay special attention to how these reproductions reflect or deviate from broader cultural narratives related to race and nation. My Master’s thesis, completed at the University of South Florida, examines narratives surrounding Confederate monument removal published in a Southern newspaper. In this project, I analyze similar reproductions of white supremacist and nationalist logics across the supposed political divide of the Confederate monument removal debate, and work to complicate the liberal/conservative binary this issue is often confined to. I also identify rhetorical strategies used to obscure links between the moral and emotional justifications for or against Confederate monument removal and wider systems of racism and U.S. nationalism. My interest in these areas stems from a desire to interrupt white supremacist and nationalism systems, and the love I have for my home, the South.

Demir, F. Dilara

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Office: Davison Hall, 046

My interests are globalization and political economy, sociology of expertise and science, technology studies. More specifically, my research focuses on the interactions between international, regional and "national" organizations struggling and negotiating to frame intellectual property after the emergence of the World Trade Organization, 1995 in Turkey. I received my BA in Philosophy (highest) and Political Science (high honor) from Bogazici University , Istanbul. I have an MA degree in Human Rights (distinction for the thesis) at University College London, awarded by Jean Monnet Scholarship Agency. I am currently a graduate fellow of a project "Networks of Exchange: Mobilities of Knowledge in a Globalized World" at the Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis.

Duffy, Robert

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Office: Davison Hall, 019   

Rob’s research interests include the environment, science and technology, media, and social movements. His research investigates how people and organizations make sense of risky or controversial technologies, and how these evaluations tie in with or challenge societal power structures. His current project examines how science has been used and misused in discourse about fracking. Rob holds a B.A. in Sociology and English from Bucknell University.

Eda, Haruki

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Website   

Curriculum Vitae

Office: Davison Hall, 012

Hello! I'm a sociologist specialized in social movements, transnational migration, critical geopolitics, race and ethnicity, and gender/sexuality. My research concerns the issues of peace and security, sovereignty, and decolonization across Asia/Pacific and North America, and I'm trained in qualitative methods and queer theory to investigate how community organizing impacts geopolitical dynamics and identity construction. I'm working on a book project entitled Queer Unification: Community and Healing in the Korean Diaspora, which examines the possibilities and imaginations of Korean unification from the perspective of queer diasporic Koreans by centering their embodied experiences as a praxis of what I call geopolitical healing. My work has appeared in Research Justice: Methodologies for Social Change (Policy Press, 2015), Social Text Periscope, and Contemporary Archipelagic Thinking: Towards New Comparative Methodologies and Disciplinary Formations (Rowman & Littlefield, forthcoming). In addition to research, I enjoy teaching sociology, Asian American studies, Asian studies, and English composition. In the classroom, I focus on challenging my students by asking them critical questions about real-world problems rather than spoon-feeding easy answers. At Rutgers University, I'm also involved in the Asian American Cultural Center, where I teach a Living-Learning Community course (check out our Instagram Photovoice project). I believe that relevant education that activates the community leaders in ourselves is what this world needs for the 21st century, and I am committed to fostering my students' intellectual, professional, and political growth through collaborative learning. 

Enos, Jenny

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Curriculum Vitae

Office: Davison Hall, 044

Drawing on her experiences growing up in Stockholm, Sweden, Jenny Enos’ main research interest is comparative conceptualizations of race and ethnicity across cultures and societies. As her senior honors thesis in Sociology, she conducted a qualitative study of the linguistic strategies used by Swedes, both in conversation with each other and in public media, to symbolically connote ethnoracial differences and understandings of national belonging. She earned her Bachelor of Arts in Sociology and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies from Gettysburg College in 2018, with a minor in Spanish. In addition to her interest in studies of race and ethnicity, Jenny also seeks to research the ways in which welfare structures in Nordic societies interact with social conceptualizations and manifestations of gender roles.

Espinoza, Maria

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Curriculum Vitae

Office: Davison Hall, 012

My research is in the fields of environmental sociology, medical sociology, and science and technology studies. My main interest is in how certain narratives about infectious diseases (e.g., the “outbreak narrative”) become the norm, prioritizing biotechnological fixes and shifting attention away from questions of social and environmental justice, public health infrastructure, and the lingering impact of economic reforms that enable disease to spread in the first place.

For my dissertation project, I focus on the dengue epidemic that hit Peru in 2017 after the unexpected climate phenomenon El Niño Costero. Specifically, I’m investigating how public health experts communicate with decision-makers and diverse publics about the expansion of climate-sensitive diseases in the face of a changing climate. I aim to shed light on the challenges that public health professionals encounter when communicating about dengue risk and climate change, and on the technologies of legitimacy they rely on to render their claims legible to different publics.

In addition to my dissertation project, I am working on a book with Melissa Aroncyzk, and Bob Brulle, titled The Climate of Publicity, for Oxford University Press. In this project we take a historical look at how promotional culture and environmental information systems have shaped environmental problems in the United States since the birth of the PR industry in the early twentieth century.

During my time at Rutgers, I have been a graduate fellow at the Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis, participating in the 2015-2016 project “Ethical Subjects: Moralities, Laws, and Histories.”

Prior to pursuing a doctoral degree, I earned a B.A. from the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru and an M.A. in Sociology from Syracuse University. I have also worked both in the social sector as a venture coordinator for Ashoka in the Andean Region and in the private sector as a consultant conducting social and environmental impact assessment studies.

Foley, Benjamin

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Office: Davison Hall, 140

Benjamin Foley is a PhD candidate in sociology, 2019-2020 graduate fellow at the Rutgers Center for Cultural Analysis, and an activist interested in how white organizers understand and navigate "whiteness" as they participate in interracial coalitions and politics. He is also the co-founder and advisory board member of the human rights video advocacy organization, Organization for Visual Progression (now called Catara). His dissertation is a historical sociological study of the Young Patriots Organization—a group of poor white migrants from Appalachia who formed in the impoverished neighborhood of “Uptown” Chicago in 1968. Paradoxically brandishing Confederate flags and Black Panther pins, they protested racism against “hillbillies” and “oppressed white people,” and claimed solidarity with other oppressed people of color around the world. Remarkably, the Illinois Black Panther Party saw the Patriots as an ally and recruited them to join their Rainbow Coalition in 1969. The Patriots’ heterodox “white revolutionary” discourse, Ben contends, complicates how we think about “whiteness” and how white anti-racism should and could happen. Rather than treating “whiteness” as an attitude or idea to be rejected, and inadvertently reaffirming its legitimacy as race category, the Patriots “produce” a race discourse where the essentialism of white/ nonwhite binary discourse is weakened, and thereby drained of some of its normative power. Through organizing free medical clinics, food pantries, and other “serve the people” programs, the Patriots link poor southern whites’ poverty and oppression to structural anti-“hillbilly” racism in Chicago. In doing so, the Patriots sought solidarity with other oppressed people of color, not out of a moral or pragmatic objection to “whiteness,” but out of a sense of shared positionally as racially oppressed by white supremacy. While the Patriots’ race discourse often erroneously (and dangerously) equates intra-white racism to racism against communities of color, it merits attention because it offers a model of antiracism that chips away at how white supremacy is reproduced in white ideology.

Galarneau, Lydia

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Office: Davison Hall, 136

Lydia received her BA from Alfred University in May 2017, graduating summa cum laude with an individually structured major titled “Social Justice and Popular Media.” Her undergraduate senior thesis examined factors causing emotional abuse recognition ability, specifically focusing on romanticization of intimate partner violence in fictional media, and received a Sigma Xi Outstanding Undergraduate Research Award. She plans to continue research in the interactions between people and fictional media, with a concentration on the representation of intimate partnerships.

Gervis, Alexandra

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Office: Davison Hall, 012

Alexandra (Lexi) Gervis is broadly interested in economic and cultural sociology; specifically, she explores questions around income and wealth inequality, race and inequality, social mobility, and how organizations (particularly, philanthropic ones) play a role in the reproduction of inequality. Her MA thesis explored the relationship between social class, social distance, and allocating decisions when donating, both in terms of magnitude (how much a family gives) and type (the kinds of organizations they select). She holds a BA from Emory University, and she is currently a Rutgers Presidential Fellow.

Good, Adrian

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Office: Davison Hall, 013

Adrian Good is interested in culture and cognition, health, alcohol use, accidents, and the life course effects of traumatic events. He received his BA in Management and Society from UNC-Chapel Hill in 2005, and completed an MA in Sociology at UNC-Greensboro in 2013. His MA thesis examines the ways male college students describe their relationship with alcohol as a cultural object. He is also interested in how people make sense of traumatic events, building bridges between former and present selves.

Guastella, Dustin

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Office: Davison Hall, 009

Dustin received his B.A in Sociology from Temple University in 2013. His research interests include the labor movement, political-economy, social class and economic inequality. Particularly he is interested in researching the working lives of recent college graduates and how their economic prospects have changed in relation to the shift toward neoliberalism and the fallout from the great recession. Dustin has previously worked in the labor movement as an organizer and mobilizer. 

Han, Tsai-Yen

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Office: Davison Hall, 016

Tsai-Yen is interested in gender, education, food and science and technology studies. She has studied how an engineering laboratory became masculinized. She is currently working on a study of high school curriculum tracking decisions in Taiwan. Tsai-Yen received her bachelor's degree in Sociology from National Taiwan University and her M.A. in Sociology at National Tsing Hua University.

Hayes, Endia Louise

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Curriculum Vitae

Office: Davison Hall, 015

Standing in the words of Toni Morrison’s “familiarize the strange and mystify the familiar,” Endia’s scholarship explores the sociological contribution of Afro-Texan enslaved, and formerly enslaved, women. Endia studies Afro-Texan female labor in the kitchen and field as not only the basis of Southern culinary cuisine but early exploration of Black women’s epistemologies that incorporated what would be Eurocentrically-defined as foundations of social theory. Endia posits these Afro-Texan women as avenues through which the Black female body and her social legacies can be properly viewed within sociology to revisit the past, unpack the present and better integrate slavery into contemporary sociological work. From earning her Bachelor’s from Spelman College alongside her employment with Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship (MMUF) and the Institute for the Recruitment of Teachers (IRT) as an alumna, Endia pushes to center the knowledge and scholarly explorations of students of color which she believes is the key to making the academy more inclusive among students and knowledge production within the higher education.

Hitchens, Brooklynn K.

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Curriculum Vitae

Office: Davison Hall, 016

Brooklynn K. Hitchens is an American Association of University Women (AAUW) Fellow who explores the lived experiences of low-income, urban Black Americans with crime and violence, particularly at the intersections of race, class, and gender in shaping attitudes, identity, and behavior. Her multi-method dissertation uses street participatory action research (PAR) to explore variations in how urban Black women and girls use violence and/or crime to cope with the structural strain that permeates low-income communities of color. Data for her dissertation emerge from a collaborative, community-based project entitled the Wilmington Street Participatory Action Research (PAR) Project, which examines how low-income, street-identified Blacks experience and understand community violence in Wilmington, Delaware—a city recently labeled “MurderTown USA” for its elevated rates of violent crime per capita.

Her work has previously been published in Sociological Forum, Race & Justice, Feminist Criminology, and the Journal of Black Psychology. Brooklynn also holds prior fellowships as a distinguished Louis Bevier Dissertation Fellow, Minority Fellow for the American Sociological Association (ASA), and Ruth D. Peterson Fellow for the American Society of Criminology (ASC). 

Hoagland, Brent

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Office: Davison Hall, 105-4

Brent's general research interests include economic sociology, organizations, knowledge, and culture. Broadly, he plans to blend network and cultural analysis to investigate financial markets, the actors and relations that make them as well as the practices that sustain them. He graduated with a BA in economics from Lafayette College in 2012, and from the MA Progam in the Social Sciences (MAPSS) at the University of Chicago in 2018.

Hofstra, Jorie

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Office: Davison Hall, 044

Jorie works in the areas of mental health and illness, embodiment, biology, disability, social support, and emotion within dyadic and network contexts. Her projects include the development and testing of a biopsychosocial model of postpartum depression, a qualitative investigation of how laypeople think about and respond to sadness in their social partners, and a study of how brain-injured subjects account for emotional disturbance in relation to the damaged brain. Central to all these projects is the matter of how cultural and social-network factors influence the ways we perceive, explain, and address our own and others' suffering. Jorie also serves as Editor for the journal RJS: The Rutgers Journal of Sociology. She is presently an NSF Graduate Research Fellow, and she holds a BA in anthropology from the University of Chicago.

Hollingshead, Ashley

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Office: Davison Hall, 011

Ashley received her B.A in Sociology from the City University of New York at City College. Her research interests include examining the intersections of race, gender, institutions, and public policy impeding opportunities for people of color. In the past Ashley worked as a project associate at The Center for Social Inclusion, a racial equity and policy strategy organization. Her past research includes examining racial disparities in beast feeding, Black and Latino activism, and Obama Fatherhood policies.

Jaffe-Dax, Hamutal (Tali)

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Office: Davison Hall, 017

My research interests stand in the crossroads of culture and cognition. I am fascinated with cultural knowledge and classification. The inquiry of social conceptualization and categorization embedded and performed in everyday practice, leads me to engagement with innovative phenomenological and visual methodologies. In my Master Thesis (Hebrew University of Jerusalem) I studied the spatial perceptions of Jerusalemites and Qudsis – local Israelis and Palestinians. Through the analysis mental mapping and sketch-mapping, Jerusalem and Al-Quds were interpreted from bottom-up perspective on borders, patterns, categorizations, experiences and identities.  

Joshi, Apoorvaa

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Office: Davison Hall, 105-5

Apoorvaa is a first-year doctoral student, interested in women’s resistance, postcolonial social movements for gender justice, feminized forms of knowledge, and the body as a site for resistance. Her previous research focused on the production of empathy in human rights discourse, and the gendered dimensions of positivist reportage.

She comes to Rutgers with several years of experience in the non-profit world, most recently working with a feminist grantmaking organization. She holds a B.A. in Political Science from the University of Michigan—Ann Arbor, and an MSc Human Rights from the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Kaplan, Amanda

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Office: Davison Hall, 140

Amanda Kaplan is a PhD candidate and a 2019-2020 graduate fellow at Rutgers' Center for Cultural Analysis interested in the values, stakes, and symptoms of dominant and dissident modes of knowledge production. These interests inform Amanda's everyday life, activism, pedagogy, and dissertation research, which concerns the logic of discovering, coloniality, whiteness, and possibilities for academic reparations and decolonization. Amanda is also a participant in the 2019-2020 PreDoctoral Leadership Development Academy, and holds an MA in Sociology (Rutgers), an MA in Humanities and Social Thought (NYU), a BA in Sociology and Mathematics (Vassar), and a graduate certificate in Women and Gender Studies (Rutgers). If seemingly preoccupied, Amanda is most likely dreaming of transdisciplinary education, social transformation, cheese, or really big dogs.

Landers, Anthony

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Office: Davison Hall, 105-6

Anthony is generally interested in state sovereignty, social control, identity, organizations, policing, punishment, and incarceration. His current research looks at the weaponization of inmate identities and its use as a form of social control in prison. Anthony has ample research experience having been a Ronald E. McNair scholar, where he used a mixed methods approach to analyze gang discourse and it’s effects on racialized communities in South Alameda County, California. He has one article pending publishing through the McNair Scholars Journal titled, Marked for Death: The Necropolitics of Gangs. Anthony received his B.A. in Sociology with a minor in Ethnic Studies from the University of California, Berkeley in 2018. Additionally, Anthony brings seven years of community organizing, prisoner support, and mentorship to his work at Rutgers.

Loprieno, Daniele

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Office: Davison Hall, 105-8

Daniele is a first-year doctoral student, interested in social determinates of health, gender, and medical sociology. She recently worked with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health’s Center for Health Impact Evaluation, where she contributed to a health impact assessment on the effects of recreational cannabis legalization in Los Angeles County. Daniele received her BA in Sociology with double minors in History and Italian from Pennsylvania State University in 2007 and completed her Master’s in Sociology at California State University, Northridge in 2013. Additionally, Daniele brings over ten years of applied research experience and four years of teaching experience to her work at Rutgers.

Outside of the classroom, Daniele enjoys consuming and (endlessly) discussing all things pop culture, practicing yoga, and spending time with her pug, George.

Lora, Dashiell

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Office: Davison Hall, 009

Dashiell completed his BA at Bowdoin College in Sociology and Music. He is broadly interested in race, youth culture, new media, popular culture and the production of identity.

Martin, Aaron

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Office: Davison Hall, 044

Aaron comes to Rutgers with six years of professional experience as a human rights and global development practitioner, where he focused on building strategic partnerships between government, philanthropy, and the social sector. Aaron's research interests lie at the intersection of individual and collective trauma, culture, cognition, memory, and inequality. He received his B.A. in English and Education from Houghton College.

Mechbal, Sirine

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Office: Davison Hall, 017

Sirine received her B.A and her M.A in American Studies at the Sorbonne University in Paris. She is now pursuing her PhD through a dual degree program between Rutgers University and La Sorbonne. Sirine is interested in immigrant workers, collective mobilization and intergroup competition - recently turning her focus onto self-employed immigrants. Her dissertation research seeks to examine the trajectories of New York City street vendors-- Egyptians and Mexicans --and their relationship to labor organizing.

Mercado-Diaz, Mario

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Curriculum Vitae

Office: Davison Hall, 014

Mario Mercado-Diaz is generally interested in international migration, social inequality, urban development, urban space, community life, decolonial theory and cultural sociology. His current research focuses on Puerto Rican migrant integration outcomes in new or emerging destinations and established destinations. He uses a mixed method approach (quantitative and qualitative) and an intersectional lens to study the effects of race and ethnicity, gender, class and education on migrant integration in new and emerging migrant destination. Specifically, he looks at migrants with relative advantage entering the professional labor markets in Texas and New York. For his dissertation research, he will compare integration outcomes and experiences of Puerto Ricans, Cubans and Venezuelans moving to Houston, Texas. Mario has ample research experience having served as a research assistant on numerous projects, more recently having done fieldwork for the Afro-Latin@ Forum and serving as a research assistant for a project on neighborhood inequality led by Dr. Laurie Krivo, Dr. Zaire Dinzey-Flores and Dr. Hana Shepherd. He earned his MA on Latin American Studies at the University of Texas, Austin. His masters thesis ("Distances and Proximities: Havana and San Juan from the Point of View of Literature and Oral Histories") used an interdisciplinary approach (Anthropology, Sociology and Cultural Studies) to compare the changing dynamics of urban space in specific neighborhoods of Havana, Cuba and San Juan, Puerto Rico (see http://lavigia.wix.com/elmuelle). He has also published journalistic articles in various online magazines, both in English and in Spanish.

Nicorici, Irina

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Office: Davison Hall, 020  

Panait, Alexandru

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Office: Davison Hall, 009

Alex graduated with a BA in sociology from the University of New Hampshire in 2014. His primary research interests include sociology of culture, institutions, networks, and digital media. His current project focuses on digital divides and the relationship between gender inequality in the labor market and digital technology use in Japan. 

Peña-Alves, Stephanie

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Curriculum Vitae

Office: Davison Hall, 013

Steph Peña-Alves is a Doctoral Candidate with research interests in the areas of culture and cognition, space and place, deviance, semiotics, and sociological theory. Her work explores inclusion and exclusion, and how individuals negotiate issues of access and restriction in everyday spaces. In her dissertation, she examines patterns in how spatial boundaries are set, regulated, and crossed at multiple levels of analysis, focusing on tensions between personal and collective definitions of rules of access as manifest in individual accounts, public discourse, law, and policy. Her work is published in Symbolic Interaction, Journal of Health Communication, and The Oxford Handbook of Cognitive Sociology. She teaches courses in deviance, race relations, and sociological theory.

Plum, Samantha

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Samantha’s research interests include culture and cognition, health and illness, and gender. Her current work focuses on conceptions of gender in university recreation, with a specific focus on non-binary and gender non-conforming students. Samantha’s previous work has looked at representations of gender norms in pharmaceutical advertisements for psychotropic medications, conceptions of gender in the sport of body building, and remission narratives. She received her B.A. in Sociology from Brown University.

Pocinki, Allegra

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Resume

Office: Davison Hall, 046

Allegra received her B.A. from Swarthmore College in 2014, where she majored in History and Political Science. Following graduation, she worked as the senior center coordinator for the Center on Children and Families at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC. Allegra is interested in racial disparities in the criminal justice system, more specifically on the impacts of incarceration for those "doing time on the outside." Her work seeks to examine the effects of coercive mobility and concentrated disadvantage on Black women’s capital formation in neighborhoods experiencing significant numbers of “missing” Black men. She hopes to add to a new but slowly developing literature on the effects of the cycle of incarceration on women, especially because it seeks to build a new set of data of these impacts on their social, human, and economic capital.

Poling, Jessica

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Office: Davison Hall, 044

Jessica Poling received her B.A. from Haverford College in Sociology (2015) and her M.A. in Sociology from Rutgers University (2018). She is generally interested in culture and cognition. Her M.A. thesis, "Art in the Time of Frugality: Uncertainty, Collaboration, and Change in Art Museums", investigates how art museums have experienced financial uncertainty since the Great Recession and in what ways this uncertainty has impacted professional relationships between curators and development officers. Her current research explores the intersection of culture and cognition with gender and the body by studying the cognitive problem-solving processes women use during dramatic physical changes such as pregnancy and mastectomies.

Salas, Jomaira

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Office: Davison Hall, 015

Jomaira Salas Pujols is a 5th-year doctoral student studying race, Black girlhood, and resistance in educational spaces. Her current research examines the Black identity development of Afro-Latina girls who participate in social justice and activism trainings. Her other projects use interviews and ethnographic methods to analyze the visible and invisible ways in which girls of color challenge school inequality. Jomaira is a National Science Foundation-GRFP Fellow and a research assistant with the Afro-Latin@ Forum. She also conducts workshops on race and educational injustice for local organizations.

Sie, Amanda

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Office: Davison Hall, 017

Amanda's research interests are in environmentalism and science and technology. She graduated from Boston College in 2017 with a B.A. in Environmental Studies. Her honors thesis investigated the foundations of modern agricultural science in America’s land-grant universities and their impact on the modern agricultural landscape, specifically in cranberry farms in Massachusetts. She has also previously work on international energy policy research and hopes to continue studying the sociological aspects of climate change.

Troxel, Hannah

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Office: Davison Hall, 136

Hannah received her B.A. from New York University's Gallatin School of Individualized Study in 2013, where she studied social change, oppression, performance, and German. She is interested in gender and sexuality, urban-rural divides, and the social construction of the "obesity epidemic" - particularly issues of medical authority, social control, and discrimination. Her previous research includes work on weight loss campaigns, post-WWII German memory and identity, and inequities in education. 

Tuangco, Katherine

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Office: Davison Hall, 015

Katherine’s research interests lie at the intersection of medical sociology and the sociology of knowledge. She received her B.A. in Social and Behavioral Sciences from Seton Hall University during her occupational therapy dual-degree program. Her fieldwork experience at the Mount Carmel Guild Behavioral Healthcare System in Union City, NJ informs her interest in the factors that shape the acquisition and acceptance of medical information and understanding. She aims to examine how health outcomes may coincide with changes in perception.

Uzun, Nil

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Office: Davison Hall, 049

Nil Uzun is interested in global sociology, sociology of speed, sociology of knowledge and sociology of science. She holds a B.A. in economics from Bogazici University (Istanbul), an MA in cultural studies from Sabanci University (Istanbul), and an MA in social anthropology from Central European University (Budapest). Nil has been working on multiple different topics, including transnational networks of human rights organizations in Argentina and Turkey, the representations of ‘Middle East women’ in Western contemporary art, and the sociology of academic knowledge production in area studies scholarship. Her dissertation examines the geopolitics of computing speed and the global race for the fastest supercomputers. 

Vuolajarvi, Niina

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Office: Davison Hall, 011

 Niina is a Mellon/ACLS dissertation fellow and a visiting student at the Gender and Sexuality Studies Program at Princeton University. Niina is finalizing her dissertation Governing Sexuality, Producing Benevolent Nations - Commercial Sex and Migration in 'Nordic Model' of Prostitution that examines the increasing role that governing sexuality and gender play in contemporary neoliberal politics and state-making. She explores this question through a Swedish prostitution model focusing on punishing sex buyers that has come to define global politics around human trafficking and commercial sex. For her dissertation, Niina conducted 215 interviews and intensive fieldwork in three Nordic countries (Sweden, Finland, Norway).

Niina's academic publishing portfolio includes over 20 articles, book chapters, book reviews and research reports on the policies and politics of immigration, commercial sex, and healthcare. Her work has been published in journals, such as Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, Sexuality Research and Social Policy, and Cultural Studies, and in collected volumes Technoscience, Gender and Society and Assessing Prostitution Policies in Europe. Her work has been recognized by the Fulbright Foundation, the Visual Journalism of the Year Award, the American-Scandinavian Foundation Award, and the Scandinavian Research Council for Criminology, among other. Her research has been featured in various newspapers, including The Economist and The New York Times.

Yohanani, Lior

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Curriculum Vitae

Office: Davison Hall, 138

Lior’s research interests include nationalism, citizenship, and immigration. In his current research, Lior examines the enlistment of Americans of Israeli origin to the Israeli military. He has also studied and published on Zionist identity during the British Mandate of Palestine during the first half of the twentieth century. Lior holds an MA in Sociology from Rutgers University, and an MA in Sociology and Anthropology from Tel Aviv University.