Core Department Faculty

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Böröcz, József

Jozsef photo Professor
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Office: Davison Hall, 132A

Professor of Sociology, teaches courses in classical sociological theory, global structures and change, historical sociology, and historical-comparative methods. His interests include narrative and visual sociologies of historical experiences, politics and performing arts, knowledge and otherness, large-scale (indeed global) transformations, and intersections of political economy, geopolitics, coloniality, ethics, aesthetics and power.

Read more: Böröcz, József

Brechin, Steven

Fac Brechin StevenProfessor
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Office: Davison Hall, 133

Professor and Graduate Director of Sociology, his teaching and research interests include organizations, politics, public opinion, and the environment.  As a comparative sociologist, Steve explores social phenomenon from local to global levels of analyses.  

Read more: Brechin, Steven

Brooks, Ethel

brooks thumbAssociate Professor
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Office: 132 George Street
Office Phone: 732-445-7395

Associate Professor in Women’s and Gender Studies and Sociology, teaches courses in comparative and historical sociology, globalization and postcolonial social formations.  Her research interests include the sociology of gender and labor, critical political economy, globalization, social movements, feminist theory, gender and development, consumption, comparative sociology, Central American studies, South Asian studies, nationalism, post-coloniality and critical race theory.  She is currently finishing a book on transnational organizing in the garment industry with a focus on Dhaka , San Salvador and New York City.

Read more: Brooks, Ethel

Bzostek, Sharon

BzostekAssociate Professor
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Office: Davison Hall, 135

Associate Professor and Undergraduate Director of Sociology, currently teaches courses on social demography and advanced research methods. Her research interests focus on recent changes in family demography and their consequences for child and family well-being, as well as social disparities in health and health care.

   

Read more: Bzostek, Sharon

Carr, Patrick

pcarrAssociate Professor
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Office: Davison Hall, 109
Office Phone: 848-932-7631

Carr writes about crime and policing, youth and social control, and the transition to adulthood. He is the author of Clean Streets: Controlling Crime, Maintaining Order and Building Community Activism https://smile.amazon.com/Patrick-Carr-Controlling-Maintaining-Community/dp/B00HTJWAIK/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=Clean+Streets%3A+Controlling+Crime&qid=1560781550&s=books&sr=1-1 (NYU Press, 2005) and  Hollowing Out the Middle: the Rural Brain Drain and What it Means for America (Beacon, 2009).  Currently, he is writing a book about the experiences of young adults after the Great Recession, and he is co-Principal Investigator on a project that  examines the role of witnesses in the criminal justice system.

Read more: Carr, Patrick

Cerulo, Karen A.

CeruloProfessor
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Office: Davison Hall, 130

Professor of Sociology, teaches courses in culture, media, social interaction, social deviance, and statistics.  She has authored several books and articles in the areas of culture and cognition, symbol systems and meaning, media and technology, social change, decision making, identity construction, and measurement techniques.  Cerulo just completed a study on olfactory meaning and she is currently in the field on a book length project entitled Dreams of a Lifetime: Society, Culture and Our Wishful Imaginings

Read more: Cerulo, Karen A.

Chaudhary, Ali R.

Fac Chaudhary AliAssistant Professor
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Office: Davison Hall, 132B

Assistant Professor of Sociology. Dr. Chaudhary’s research interests lie at the intersection of international migration, organizations, and the sociology of music. His scholarship examines how symbolic boundaries such as race, nationality, religion, and nativity shape several social processes such as immigrant integration, nonprofit sector development, cultural incorporation through music, and the racialized production of musical instruments and music genres. He teaches undergraduate and graduate-level courses on immigration in the United States, comparative immigration studies, and contemporary sociological theory.  His latest research examines how race and nativity informed the employment experiences of musicians during the second half of the twentieth century and how these boundaries affect contemporary musicians in metropolitan New York City.    

Read more: Chaudhary, Ali R.

Clarke, Lee

clarke5Professor
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Office: Davison Hall, 113

Professor of Sociology, writes about organizations, failure, disaster, risk communication, and the boundaries between politics and science. His last work, Worst Cases: Terror and Catastrophe in the Popular Imagination was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2006. Clarke is currently writing a book about how science and politics meet, and don’t meet, regarding the loss of America’s wetlands and the idea of “coastal restoration.”  

http://leeclarke.com/clarkebio.html

Read more: Clarke, Lee

Covington, Jeanette

default photoAssociate Professor
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Office: Davison Hall, 114
Office Phone: 848-932-7693

Associate Professor of Sociology teaches courses on crime and drugs. Her current research examines how crime figures in the construction of race. In the past few years, she has had several articles published on how criminologists assign meaning to the construct of blackness in their analyses of race differences in crime. She also examines these issues in greater detail in her book titled Crime and Racial Constructions. Not only does the book take a look at how criminologists create racial images, it also considers how many of these same images of criminal blacks are disseminated in popular culture by Hollywood and other media.

  

Read more: Covington, Jeanette

Dinzey-Flores, Zaire

dinzey thumbAssociate Professor
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Office: Davison Hall, 119

Associate Professor in Latino and Hispanic Caribbean Studies and Sociology, teaches courses on urbanism, Caribbean societies and development, race and ethnicity, and research methods. Her research interests are in the areas of urbanism, space and place, the built environment, race and ethnicity, social inequality, mixed-method research, criminal justice, Latin America and Caribbean Studies, and African Diaspora. She is currently working on a book that examines the social impacts of gates in public and private housing in Puerto Rico.  

Read more: Dinzey-Flores, Zaire

Dowd, Jeffrey

Fac Dowd JeffTeaching Instructor

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Office: Davison Hall, 040

Jeffrey Dowd is an Assistant Instructor in the Department of Sociology. He received his Ph.D. in Sociology from Rutgers University and his BA from Kean University. He teaches a variety of courses at Rutgers including Introduction to Sociology, Social Problems, Race Relations, and Statistics for Sociology. Jeff has previously taught in the Writing Program and Criminology department at Rutgers as well as in Sociology at Montclair University, Kean University, and Goucher College. His research interests include racial discourse and pedagogy (e.g. teaching styles and student learning preferences). He currently serves on the executive council for Rutgers AAUP-AFT.

Friedman, Brittany

Picture Brittany FriedmanAssistant Professor
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Office: Davison Hall 043

Assistant Professor of Sociology, teaches courses in punishment, criminology, and racial inequality. Her research focuses on incarceration conditions, punishment severity, and the prison social system. She is currently finishing a book about the systematic targeting of black militant prisoners for extreme punishment and the means through which prisoners mobilize in response. This project draws on her related studies examining the Black Guerilla Family in California and the subjective experience of long-term confinement. She is a member of the Multi-State Study of Monetary Sanctions, an eight state study comparing the consequences of monetary sanctions in the criminal justice system on reentry and racial and socioeconomic inequality.

Read more: Friedman, Brittany

Gerson, Judith

gersonAssociate Professor
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Office: Davison Hall, 139
Office Phone: 848-932-7804

Associate Professor of Sociology, teaches courses in collective memory, immigration, the aftermath of catastrophe, narrative, and gender. Her primary areas of interest include forced migration and the Holocaust, collective memory, narrative, gender, and contemporary social theory. Currently she is completing a book manuscript tentatively titled, By Thanksgiving We Were Americans: German Jewish Refugees and Holocaust Memory, which relies on memoirs, diaries and testimonies to unravel the complexities of how those who lived recall their past.  


  

Read more: Gerson, Judith

Hansell, Stephen

hansell1Associate Professor
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Office: Davison Hall, 101A
Office Phone: 609-203-2830

Associate Professor of Sociology, teaches courses on the sociology of medicine and health care, research methods, and statistics. He is interested in medical sociology, social networks, globalization, and the sociology of science.  His current research is about the effects of managed care on adolescents.

Read more: Hansell, Stephen

Hirschfield, Paul

PHirschfieldAssociate Professor
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Office: Davison Hall, 038

Associate Professor of Sociology and faculty affiliate of the Criminal Justice Program, teaches criminology, punishment and social control, and juvenile justice. His theoretical and empirical work focuses on social control and criminalization in relation to schools and policing. His current research centers on the expansion of positive and restorative alternatives to exclusionary discipline and school-based arrests and the organizational and legal control of deadly force by police.

Read more: Hirschfield, Paul

Jones, Leslie Kay

leslie crop for site1Assistant Professor
Leslie Kay Jones
Office: Davison Hall, 131

Leslie Kay Jones is an Assistant Professor of Sociology focusing on social movements, digital media, race and gender. She teaches qualitative research methods, particularly digital ethnography. Leslie’s recent article, BlackLivesMatter: An Analysis of the Movement as Social Drama, proposes a theoretical model for the role of the Black Twitter counterpublic in mediating the frames of #BlackLivesMatter protests.

Read more: Jones, Leslie Kay

Kempner, Joanna

kempner 2018Associate Professor
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Office: Davison Hall, 134

Joanna Kempner, associate professor of sociology, works at the intersection of medicine, science, gender, and the body. Kempner investigates the production of knowledge and ignorance as cultural work, inscribed with and shaped by tacit assumptions about social relations across gender, race, and class. Her award-winning book, Not Tonight: Migraine and the Politics of Gender and Health (Chicago 2014), examines the social values embedded in the way we talk about, understand, and make policies for people in pain. She is currently writing a book about citizen scientists who use psychedelic medicine to treat pain. She teaches courses on social problems, health and illness, and the sociology of the body.

Read more: Kempner, Joanna

Krivo, Lauren J.

 

Fac Krivo LaurenProfessor
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Office: Davison Hall, 111

Professor of Sociology, teaches courses in race, crime, and community and in statistics for sociology. Her research focuses on race-ethnic differences in neighborhood crime, patterns and consequences of segregation, and spatial inequality. Her book with Ruth D. Peterson Divergent Social Worlds: Neighborhood Crime and the Racial-Spatial Divide was published by the Russell Sage Foundation in 2010. She is currently examining patterns and sources of changing neighborhood inequality in crime after 2000 based on the second wave of the National Neighborhood Crime Study conducted with Christopher J. Lyons and María B. Vélez.

Read more: Krivo, Lauren J.

LaPointe, Eleanor

Fac LaPointe EleanorAssistant Teaching Professor

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Office: Davison Hall, 042

 

 

Instructor in Sociology who received her Ph.D. from Rutgers in 1991.   Her teaching interests are primarily  in sociological theory, race relations, the sociology of mental health/illness and medical sociology more generally.  As an N.J.-licensed massage therapist, she has been actively involved in holistic health care for over two decades.   In addition to her teaching and involvement in the RU Senate, she is affiliated with Stockton University in southern N.J., where she received her undergraduate degree.

Lee, Catherine

lee smallAssociate Professor
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Office: Davison Hall, 141
Office Phone: 848-932-7807

Associate Professor of Sociology. Her research and teaching areas include race and ethnicity, gender, politics, immigration, law and society, and science and medicine. She is the author of Fictive Kinship: Family Reunification and the Meaning of Race and Nation in American Immigration and co-editor of Genetics and the Unsettled Past: The Collision of DNA, Race, and History.

Read more: Lee, Catherine

Lei, Lei

Lei LeiAssistant Professor
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Office: Davison Hall, 039

 

Assistant Professor of sociology. Her broad research and teaching interests include health, family, demography, and urban sociology. She has studied the impact of neighborhood social and physical environment on the health and well-being of children and adults in different societies. Her current research focuses on how male out-migration influences the health and nutrition of left-behind wives and children in India.

Read more: Lei, Lei

MacKendrick, Norah

mackendrickAssociate Professor
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Office: Davison Hall,  Room107

Associate Professor of Sociology, studies and teaches in the areas of environmental sociology, gender, sociology of food, consumer studies, science & technology studies, and medical sociology.  Author of Better Safe than Sorry: How Consumers Navigate Exposure to Everyday Toxics (University of California Press, 2018).

Read more: MacKendrick, Norah

Mai, Quan

Mai QuanAssistant Professor
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Office: Davison Hall, 049

Assistant Professor of Sociology. Dr. Mai’s research and teaching interests include work & occupations, social stratification, social movements, research methods, and environmental sociology. His scholarship focuses on how a range of social relations—including employment relations, race-ethnic relations, state regulatory capacity, and social movements—combine in the economy, polity, and in urban spaces to influence processes of social stratification. His current projects explore various consequences of nonstandard employment for workers’ labor market outcomes and socioeconomic well-being.

Read more: Mai, Quan

McLean, Paul

FAC McLean PaulProfessor
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Office: Davison Hall, 126

Professor of Sociology, teaches courses on sociological theory, network analysis, political and economic sociology, and the sociology of culture. One main line of research explores the relationship between social network structure and cultural practices and schemata. The Art of the Network (Duke UP, 2007) treated this relationship by examining political patronage networks and letter-writing in Renaissance Florence. His second book, Culture in Networks (Polity, 2017), explores various ways in which culture and networks intersect across sundry aspects of social life. Other interests include politics in early modern states, the network organization of the Renaissance economy, Adam Smith's social theory, and the culture of videogaming. 

   

Read more: McLean, Paul

Phillips, Julie

Professor
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Office: Davison Hall, 101C

Professor and Chair of Sociology, specializing in demography and its intersection with health outcomes and different forms of lethal violence. Her current research examines the sharp increase in suicide in the United States and how and why suicide risk varies over the life course and across birth cohorts.  Professor Phillips teaches courses in population studies, health, research methods, statistics, and criminology.    

Read more: Phillips, Julie

Roos, Patricia A.

Fac Roos PatriciaProfessor   
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Office: Davison Hall, 115

Professor of Sociology, teaches courses in sociological writing; research methods; and inequalities. Two research projects currently occupy her time: occupational sex segregation since 2000 and grief and resilience in the midst of the opioid epidemic.

 

   

Read more: Roos, Patricia A.

Salime, Zakia

SalimeAssociate Professor
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Office: Davison Hall, 137
Office Phone: 848-932-7798

Zakia Salime teaches courses in feminist theory, gender, globalization, contemporary social theory, social movements, postcolonial theory. Salime’s book: Between Feminism and Islam: Human Rights and Sharia Law in Morocco (Minnesota, 2011) illustrates this interplay of global regimes of rights and local discourses by exploring the spaces of encounters of liberal feminism and Islamism in Morocco.  Her co-edited volume Freedom Without Permission: Bodies and Spaces in the Arab Revolutions (Duke, 2016) explores how bodies, subjectivities and memories were constituted and constitutive of sexed and gendered spaces during the North African and Middle Easter Uprisings of 2011. Salime’s current book manuscript explores global extractive modes of governance through the study of land-and-resource-grab in Morocco. The study unpacks the nexus of law, power, gender, and capital through attending to peasant populations' quotidian dealing with the state and its regimes of legality, citizenship, inclusion and exclusion.  Salime publications encompass a wide range of interests including urban youth protests and music, Islamophobia, war and racial politics in the U.S.

Read more: Salime, Zakia

Shepherd, Hana

Fac Shepherd HanaAssistant Professor
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Office: Davison Hall, 037

Assistant Professor of Sociology. Shepherd teaches classes in interventions and social change, organizations, and culture. She studies how social networks, social norms and group processes, culture, and organizations facilitate or impede social change. She is currently working on a series of projects on the enforcement of local labor law, and on social networks and low-wage work.

Read more: Shepherd, Hana

Smith, D. Randall

Fac Smith D. RandallAssociate Professor
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Office: Davison Hall, 037
Office Phone: 848-932-7797

Associate Professor of Sociology is currently conducting research on the indirect benefits of big-time intercollegiate athletics for colleges and universities. Over the years his research interests have also included labor markets, social networks, criminal careers and criminal sentencing, and bias and inequality in performance evaluations. He has taught a variety of statistics courses and sociology of sport at the graduate level.

Read more: Smith, D. Randall

Springer, Kristen W.

Fac Springer KristenAssociate Professor
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Office: Davison Hall, 040

Associate Professor of Sociology, conducts research on gender, health, families, and aging. She is currently engaged in three broad research projects: 1) the gendered health effect of marital income across the life course, 2) the influence of masculinity ideals on men’s healthcare seeking behaviors, and 3) the interactive influence of biology and social environment for understanding gendered health. Professor Springer teaches advanced research methods, sociology of the family, and classes on incorporating biology and the social environment.

Read more: Springer, Kristen W.

Stein, Arlene

Fac Stein ArleneProfessor
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Office: Davison Hall, 045

Professor of sociology, specializing in the intersection of gender, sexuality, culture, and politics, and director of the Institute for Research on Women at Rutgers. The author or editor of nine books, she teaches courses on the sociology of gender and sexuality, culture, self and society, and trauma/memory, among other subjects. She serves on the graduate faculty of the Department of Women's and Gender Studies.

Read more: Stein, Arlene

Zerubavel, Eviatar

 

eviatarProfessor    
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Office: Davison Hall, 131

Professor Zerubavel is Board of Governors and Distinguished Professor of Sociology. He teaches courses in cognitive sociology, sociology of time, social memory, and sociological theory. His latest five books explored the sociomental shape of the past, the social organization of silence and denial, the social construction of genealogical relatedness, the sociology of inattention, and the phenomenology and semiotics of taken-for-grantedness. He is currently writing a book on formal-sociological theorizing.

Read more: Zerubavel, Eviatar